The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
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20 Sep 2017

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Throughout our region we are fortunate enough to encounter all kinds of wildlife. They inhabited this area first and we over took their migration paths and feeding grounds. As majestic as they are, moose, elk, deer and even buffalo can wreak havoc on newly planted and established landscapes. Big game animals tend to be in our neighborhoods in the fall, winter and spring. As the snow melts, they return to higher elevations for the summer months.
There are a few strategies to deter wildlife from our landscapes. Use these strategies alone or in combination to protect your valuable landscape from big game damage.

Use Wildlife-Resistant Plants:
No plant is ‘wildlife-proof’. If animals are starving, they will eat anything available. However, some plants tend to be less palatable to wildlife. If your home is in an area frequented by wildlife, avoid disappointment by choosing these plants:
• Spruce
• Buffaloberry
• Cotoneaster
• Juniper
• Lilac
• Potentilla
• Serviceberry
• Spirea
• Viburnum
• Hawthorne

Apples, crabapples, birch, willow, roses and dogwood are best avoided as these are preferred by wildlife.
For a complete list, click here: http://dev.mdlandscapinginc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/GardeningAroundDeer.pdf

Repellents:
Commercially made repellants such as Plantskydd™ are effective when applied as directed. Apply repellants at intervals throughout season for best results.

Scare Tactics:
Wildlife don’t like unfamiliar sounds, lights or movement. Lights on motion sensors or a well-trained barking dog can be helpful.

Predator Urine:
This is a natural way of keeping wildlife out of your yard. A few drops in placed in strategic areas around your property can keep game out for 1-3 weeks. Animals eventually get used to the scent and other tactics need to be used at this point. Available from predatorpee.com.

Wildlife Fencing:
A physical barrier has proved time and time again to be the most reliable way to keep big game away from your plants. Fence off individual trees, groups of trees or entire properties.

Dealing with wildlife can be tricky.  On one hand you want to protect the investment of your landscape while being as respectful to nature as possible. Being flexible and ready to use multiple strategies is often the best approach to dealing with wildlife on your property.

09 Sep 2017

Spring Flowering Bulbs: Plant Now for Spring Color

Spring flowering bulbs are one of the easiest ways to add color around your home in early spring. Tulips, crocus and daffodils need to be planted this fall to bloom next spring. Instead of dull brown, white and grey surrounding you next April, imagine brilliant pops of yellow, purple, red or orange after a long Teton winter.  Pollinating insects also love flowering bulbs in your garden. As one of the first food sources available early spring, pollinators rely on these flowers early season. A little investment in bulbs this fall will be well appreciated next spring.

Planting is easy and can be done anytime between mid-September through October, or even later if the ground is not yet frozen. Select a location with good drainage. If you’re not sure if the drainage is good or not, dig a test hole and fill it with water. The water should drain through in a few minutes. If not, find a different site. Bulbs will rot if situated in spots with poor drainage. Dig a hole twice as deep as the height of the bulb. For example, a 2 inch daffodil bulb needs a hole that is 4 inches deep.  Sprinkle bulb food or bone meal at the bottom of the hole. For larger masses of bulbs, dig one bigger pit at the correct depth.  Place the bulbs in, pointy side up and top with soil. Water thoroughly and enjoy a happy display of color next spring!

Bulbs and Critters:

Worried that everything you plant will be eaten? Fear not, follow these tips:

  • Select less palatable varieties such as daffodils, snow drops, crocus and alliums.
  • Plant with a repellant such as Plantskyd ™, Repellex™ or blood meal.
  • In extreme cases, bulbs can be planted within a wire mesh cage.So tough! Crocus come up each spring and are not phased by additional snow or cold.

 

 

 

01 Sep 2017

5 Reasons to Plant Trees this Fall

 

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:

1)      Less Stress:

Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

2)      Warm Ground Temperatures:

Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.

3)      Ready to Grow:

Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

4)      Fall Specials:

Fall is a great time to shop. All container trees and shrubs are 20% off.

5)      One Less Spring Project:

Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen.  For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October.