The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
30 Sep 2019

October Checklist:

It’s a great month to tackle fall yard projects. Some effort this fall will set up your landscape for success and beauty next season and will shorten the to-do list next spring.

Cut back perennial flowers: Once the foliage is brown, perennials can be cut to the ground. Consider leaving some sturdy perennials standing in place for late fall and winter interest. Sedums, coneflower, Russian sage and ornamental grasses can be left standing and look beautiful with a dusting of snow or frost. Cutting back other perennials flowers will save you the task next spring.

Plant spring-flowering bulbs: Wake up your garden next spring with colorful daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and tulips. Spring-blooming bulbs add the color you’ll be craving after winter and provide an early season food source for pollinating insects. Plant bulbs any time in October and enjoy pops of color for years to come.

Plant garlic: Hardy and full-flavored, homegrown garlic is one of the easiest crops to grow. Begin by preparing the soil. It should be about 12 inches deep and amended with compost. Choose garlic varieties meant for planting, not the grocery-store kind. We have a great selection of cold-hardy, gourmet garlic. Separate garlic into cloves. Plant each clove pointy side up about 4 inches deep and 4 to 6 inches apart. One head of garlic will typically yield 8-10 heads next year. Water thoroughly. The garlic will sprout next spring and be ready to harvest late summer.
Water: A cold dry fall can be deadly for many ornamental plants. Well-hydrated roots increase a plants’ chance of survival before our seasonal blanket of snow. Water lawns, trees, shrubs and flower beds every week or two (depending on the weather) until the snow stays on the ground. Fall watering is especially important for evergreen trees.

Protect Trees and Shrubs:
Evergreens like spruce, pine and juniper lose moisture as their needles transpire through the winter. New evergreens are not able to keep up with the rate of moisture loss because their root systems are not yet deep enough. An anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ can be sprayed on evergreen needles mid to late October. Wilt Pruf™ helps slow down transpiration and can make the difference between brown, crispy needles or lush green needles next spring.

Protect trees and shrubs from browsing deer, moose or gnawing rodents with Plantskydd™ liquid or granular repellent. In cases with frequent large game browsing, seasonal fencing may be needed.

Voles can girdle and kill a tree overwinter by chewing the bark around the base of the trunk. Apples and crabapples are especially vulnerable. A rigid plastic trunk guard can be placed around the trunk to protect it. Remove the trunk guard the following spring to allow for airflow.

Mulch is useful to moderate soil temperatures, retain moisture and suppress weeds. Apply a 2-3 inch layer of mulch around the base of trees and shrubs, being careful not to pile it up right against the trunk.

Some deciduous trees like maples are prone to cracking over winter. Cracking is caused when the trunk heats up in the sun during the day and then cools off dramatically at night. The temperature difference causes vertical, spiraling cracks down the trunk. A lightweight tree wrap will help protect the trunk. Wrap trunks late fall and remove the wrap in the spring.

Spread wildflower and grass seed: Fall is one of the best times for seeding. Wildflower and grass seed will lay dormant until spring and germinate once the soil temperatures warm up. As a bonus, residual moisture from snowmelt and spring rains speed up germination.

Replenish veggie beds: Now great time to feed the soil in your veggie garden. After harvesting and cleaning up plant debris, spread a 2-4 inch layer of compost (we like Happy Frog or Black Gold brands) over top and work it into the top 6 inches or so with a spade or digging fork. Rake smooth and your beds will be ready to rock next season.
Note: Do this when the soil is dry to avoid a clumpy, muddy mess and to keep the soil from becoming compact.

Fertilize and protect your lawn: A late application of fall lawn fertilizer (or winterizer) will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and healthy new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health. To minimize vole damage, spread a repellant like Molemax™ or Reppelex™ over lawns.
Take advantage of fall sale pricing: Espoma™ organic fall lawn food is now 50%off.

23 Sep 2019

Fall Lawn Care

Even in cooler weather, lawn grasses are still growing, photosynthesizing and developing roots. A little extra love each fall helps your lawn to be healthy, lush and resilient.

-Continue to water your lawn to supplement natural rainfall.
-Mow your lawn slightly shorter than normal. Less top growth means less dead or moldy grass to rake up in the spring.
-A late application of fall lawn fertilizer will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and faster new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health. Go organic this year with Espoma organic Fall Lawn Winterizer.

-Protect against voles: Commercial repellents such as Molemax(tm) should be spread as late in the fall as possible. These products make turf less palatable to pesky voles, helping to lessen damage overwinter.
-Reseed any thin spots, dog spots or damaged areas in your lawn. Be sure to either add a light layer of topsoil or fluff up the soil in these areas with a rake.
-Rake up any thick mats of leaves that smother your lawn. You can also mow over your leafy areas to shred up the leaves.

16 Sep 2019

Five Shrubs for Fall Color:

Dwarf Honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera): This could be the top of the list of under-used shrubs. Also known as northern bush honeysuckle and bush honeysuckle, this is a hardy native shrub of eastern North America. Though not a true honeysuckle, it has honeysuckle-like yellow flowers mid through late summer. Dwarf honeysuckle is very adaptable and can grow in full sun or partial shade. It grows 3-4 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide. The real show starts late August with gorgeous flush of bronze, orange and red. Plant several together for a striking fall color punch.

Peking Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster acutifolia): This is a large shrub, growing up to 8-10 feet tall and 6-8 feet wide. Native to Siberia, this shrub is extremely hardy and adaptable to many soil types. It is densely branched making it excellent as a screen or hedge. Dark green leaves turn orangey-red early fall. Tiny white flowers early summer form dark red berries that birds love. Hedge cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lucida) shares these same attributes and can be used interchangeably with Peking cotoneaster.

Amur Maple (Acer ginalla sp.): If you are searching for a bright red fall exclamation point, this is your ticket. Amur maple is a large multi-stemmed shrub that can grow up to 15 feet tall and wide. Amur maple is native to northern Russia and Eastern Mongolia and is extremely cold hardy. Glossy, deep green leaves through the summer develop intense red fall color in September. Amur maple varieties include ‘flame’ and ‘compact’.

Black Chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa): Pretty clusters of white flowers in the spring are followed by black berries later in the summer that attracts birds. Glossy green foliage becomes brilliant orange in autumn. Black chokeberry is adaptable to wet or dry soils but prefers full sun. Grows up to 6 feet tall and wide.

Dogwood (Cornus sericea sp.): Dogwoods deserve a special mention, not because of their fall foliage color, but because of the colorful stems that remain once the foliage has fallen for the season. Gorgeous red or yellow branches add color to any landscape fall through the winter months. A mainstay for landscapes in our region, these durable native shrubs make great wildlife habitat and are adaptable to sun or shade.

04 Sep 2019

Garden Tomato Caprese Salad

Recipes from a Garden:
Garden Tomato Caprese Salad

After a summer of toil, a gardener’s great reward are THE best tomatoes in the world. We love this method as
one of the best and easiest ways to highlight your homegrown tomatoes!
-4 large tomatoes
-1 pound fresh mozzarella
– 6-8 fresh basil leaves, torn or chopped
– olive oil, for drizzling
– balsamic vinegar
-salt and pepper
Cut the tomato and mozzarella into thick slices. Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with basil. Drizzle with olive oil, a few splashes of balsamic and season with salt and pepper.

02 Sep 2019

September is for planting!

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:
Fall Specials: Fall is a great time to shop. Take advantage of sale pricing all month!

Less Stress: Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

Warm Ground Temperatures: Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.
Ready to Grow: Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

One Less Spring Project: Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant.

We offer a five-year warranty on trees and shrubs when you plant using Myke™. Ask our friendly garden center staff for details.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen. For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October. Fruit trees and crabapples are delicious winter food for voles and need to be protected before the snow flies. Stop by our greenhouse for trunk guards and repellant and help save the heartache of damaged and dead trees next spring.