The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
16 Sep 2019

Five Shrubs for Fall Color:

Dwarf Honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera): This could be the top of the list of under-used shrubs. Also known as northern bush honeysuckle and bush honeysuckle, this is a hardy native shrub of eastern North America. Though not a true honeysuckle, it has honeysuckle-like yellow flowers mid through late summer. Dwarf honeysuckle is very adaptable and can grow in full sun or partial shade. It grows 3-4 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide. The real show starts late August with gorgeous flush of bronze, orange and red. Plant several together for a striking fall color punch.

Peking Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster acutifolia): This is a large shrub, growing up to 8-10 feet tall and 6-8 feet wide. Native to Siberia, this shrub is extremely hardy and adaptable to many soil types. It is densely branched making it excellent as a screen or hedge. Dark green leaves turn orangey-red early fall. Tiny white flowers early summer form dark red berries that birds love. Hedge cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lucida) shares these same attributes and can be used interchangeably with Peking cotoneaster.

Amur Maple (Acer ginalla sp.): If you are searching for a bright red fall exclamation point, this is your ticket. Amur maple is a large multi-stemmed shrub that can grow up to 15 feet tall and wide. Amur maple is native to northern Russia and Eastern Mongolia and is extremely cold hardy. Glossy, deep green leaves through the summer develop intense red fall color in September. Amur maple varieties include ‘flame’ and ‘compact’.

Black Chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa): Pretty clusters of white flowers in the spring are followed by black berries later in the summer that attracts birds. Glossy green foliage becomes brilliant orange in autumn. Black chokeberry is adaptable to wet or dry soils but prefers full sun. Grows up to 6 feet tall and wide.

Dogwood (Cornus sericea sp.): Dogwoods deserve a special mention, not because of their fall foliage color, but because of the colorful stems that remain once the foliage has fallen for the season. Gorgeous red or yellow branches add color to any landscape fall through the winter months. A mainstay for landscapes in our region, these durable native shrubs make great wildlife habitat and are adaptable to sun or shade.

04 Sep 2019

Garden Tomato Caprese Salad

Recipes from a Garden:
Garden Tomato Caprese Salad

After a summer of toil, a gardener’s great reward are THE best tomatoes in the world. We love this method as
one of the best and easiest ways to highlight your homegrown tomatoes!
-4 large tomatoes
-1 pound fresh mozzarella
– 6-8 fresh basil leaves, torn or chopped
– olive oil, for drizzling
– balsamic vinegar
-salt and pepper
Cut the tomato and mozzarella into thick slices. Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with basil. Drizzle with olive oil, a few splashes of balsamic and season with salt and pepper.

02 Sep 2019

September is for planting!

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:
Fall Specials: Fall is a great time to shop. Take advantage of sale pricing all month!

Less Stress: Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

Warm Ground Temperatures: Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.
Ready to Grow: Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

One Less Spring Project: Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant.

We offer a five-year warranty on trees and shrubs when you plant using Myke™. Ask our friendly garden center staff for details.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen. For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October. Fruit trees and crabapples are delicious winter food for voles and need to be protected before the snow flies. Stop by our greenhouse for trunk guards and repellant and help save the heartache of damaged and dead trees next spring.