The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
15 Feb 2019

Three Sisters Garden

Early Native Americans traditionally planted corn, squash and beans together. These crops grew so well together that they became known as the Three Sisters. Here is a classic example of companion gardening where each plant helps another. The corn stalks provide a trellis for the beans to climb, the beans provide nitrogen for the corn and squash. The squash in turn provides protection for the beans and corn by shading the soil and discouraging pests with their spiny stems. Growing a Three Sisters garden would be an excellent lesson for kids about co-dependence and growing food.
This garden theme is fun with kids because the plants grow fast and they grow big. The seeds themselves are relatively large and easier for little hands to handle and plant. These veggies all like to grow in warm soil, so wait until the first or second week of June to start. This garden needs its own spot with good soil and full sun. To begin, build up a gently sloping mound of soil. Incorporate a granular vegetable fertilizer into the soil. Plant the corn seeds in the center. Wait a couple of weeks until the corn has grown up about 6 inches then surround the corn with bean seeds. Plant the squash seeds surrounding the corn and beans, on the sloping edge of the mound.
– Corn: Choose any short season variety or buy starts from a garden center.
– Beans: Pole beans are traditionally grown in this garden, but bush beans would be fine too. Sow seed directly into the prepared area.
– Squash: Zucchini and yellow summer squash are the easiest bets for our region. Sow from seed or buy starts from a garden center.

04 Feb 2019

Hummingbird Habitat Garden

Delight your senses each summer with a backyard hummingbird haven. After their long migration from Central America and Mexico, these little guys are ready to hang out and eat. Hummingbirds are famous for visiting feeders, but providing additional food sources will enhance their habitat. With their long beaks, hummingbirds sip nectar from flowers. Although they are attracted to red flowers, it’s the sugar content in the nectar that keep hummingbirds returning for more. Here are some of their favorite flowers:
• Bee balm
• Salvia
• Honeysuckle
• Penstemon
• Jupiter’s beard
• Dianthus
• Nicotiana
• Callibrachoa
• Nepeta
• Verbena
Most of these can be found at your local garden center either already growing as ‘starts’ or in seed form.
Hummingbirds need safe perches to rest upon, such as trees and shrubs. A nearby water source like a bird bath or fountain is also important. In addition to sipping nectar, hummingbirds are insectivores, feeding on tiny insects such as aphids, thrips and spiders. Creating a hummingbird habitat is a worthy theme that will benefit your garden and these birds.

23 Jan 2019

The Snack Garden

Feeling a bit hungry? Just walk out to your Snack Garden and pluck a few berries or veggies. These foods can be foraged right from your yard and require little or no chopping, washing, cooking or fuss. Snacks from the garden don’t come in plastic wrappers and are 100% healthy. The best part though is the flavor. Home grown food just tastes better. This garden could be planted in a raised bed, containers, in a greenhouse or incorporated throughout your landscaping. From vine to mouth with little or no prep, this garden would fit the bill for a busy family.
Snack Garden plants:
My absolute must-haves are snap peas and cherry tomatoes, but any or all of these would make fine Snack Garden picks.
– Snap peas
-Broccoli
-Carrots
-Radishes
-Cherry tomatoes
-Berries (strawberries, raspberries, currants, gooseberries and serviceberries)
-Apples
The Set-Up:
This idea is very flexible depending on what you have in place or how extensive you’d like to go.
Most of the veggies will do best in a raised bed in full sun. Tomatoes grow well in big containers like an EarthBox™ or even a used plastic nursery pot. Strawberries and raspberries need a patch of their own to sprawl. Currants, gooseberries and serviceberries and apple trees can be planted throughout your existing landscaping or set apart in a place of their own.

16 Jan 2019

Hanging Houseplants

Hanging plants are a great way to add life and beauty to any indoor room. They help purify the air we breathe by removing carbon dioxide, adding oxygen and absorbing other toxins such as formaldehyde. Hanging plants frees up floor space and adds visual interest. Hanging plants can also be positioned to take advantage a room’s best light.
To begin, choose the location. Most indoor plants require bright, indirect light and a spot that is neither hot, cold nor drafty. Secure a hook or eye bolt to the ceiling. Be sure to set it directly into a beam or stud.
Next, select a hanging plant. Consider that the plant will be viewed from below and look for attractive foliage that will cascade over the edges of its container. The choices are wide, but here are some of our favorites:
Spider Plant: This is one of the most common houseplants. The spider plant is adaptable, fuss-free and is an excellent choice for beginners. It’s fast-growing and the new plantlets are easy to remove to make new plants. The spider plant is also excellent at filtering the air we breathe.
Ivy: Ivy is a fast growing houseplant that has been popular since Victorian times. It is very easy to grow from cuttings. Ivy plants enjoy lots of humidity, so misting often will help keep them at their best.
Pothos: Pothos is adaptable to a wide range of indoor environments, making it another great choice for beginners. The heart-shaped leaves can be solid green, but are commonly variegated with white and yellow splashes. It is not too picky about water or humidity, just avoid direct sun.
Christmas Cactus: These showy plants are not the sun-loving, spiny desert cactus of the western US, but a mountainous rain forest cactus of Brazil. The bright, tubular blooms are a welcome addition during the darkest time of the year. They enjoy bright light, high humidity and consistent moisture.
Boston Fern: Boston fern has gorgeous crinkly fronds that are perfect for a hanging accent. It likes cool room temperatures, high humidity and consistent watering.
Hoya: The hoya is a trailing plant with fleshy leaves and clusters of waxy flowers that bloom from May to September. New stems are almost bare and the leaves appear much later. They can be variegated or solid green.
Water needs will vary depending on your indoor climate and plant choice. As you bring new plants into your home, check them every few days or so. Feel the soil with your fingers to determine if it’s dry or not. Water carefully with room temperature water and be sure not to let any plant sit in standing water. Bring hanging plants down monthly and shower them in a kitchen sink or bathtub. A monthly shower will remove dust and allow the plants to be thoroughly soaked. Most indoor plants need less water and fertilizer through the winter months and more during the growing months of March- August. For plants that require high humidity, consider grouping these with other plants to create a humid micro climate. Regular misting, pebble trays and room humidifiers will benefit the humid-loving plants.
Plant hangers are not necessary but will add a decorative component. Macramé, galvanized metal and woven plant hangers can be found at our garden center.

07 Sep 2018

5 Reasons to Plant Bulbs this Fall

1- Bulbs are Beautiful:
Vibrant colors, fragrance and eye appealing combinations make bulbs one of the most charming flowers of the spring.

2- Bulbs are Easy to Plant:
Plant them once, and you’ll be rewarded with color year after year. Simply choose a sunny spot with well-drained soil. Dig a hole two to three times the bulb’s height (for example if a bulb is two inches tall, dig a hole four to six inches deep). Sprinkle the bottom of the hole with bulb food or bone meal and place the bulb pointy side up. Cover with soil, water once and wait for spring! To plant bigger clumps of bulbs, follow the same method as above but make a wider hole and place multiple bulbs into the same hole. This ‘mass grave’ method saves a ton of time and bigger clumps of bulbs will make more of a visual impact than a scattering of single bulbs.

3- Bulbs Will Make You Happy:
Imagine a warm spring day after months of seeing mostly snow, ice and mud. You walk outside and ta-da! A pretty clump of purple crocus are blooming right next to the receeding snow. Studies have shown that flowers release the ‘happy’ brain chemicals triggering positive emotions. Plant bulbs to plant happiness!

4- Bulbs Feed the Pollinators:
Yes, bulbs are wonderful for spring color, but did you know that flowering bulbs are also a valuable food source for bees? Bulbs are one of the first available pollen sources for bees and other pollinating insects.

5- Bulbs Need to be Planted in the Fall:
All spring-blooming bulbs like daffodils, tulips and crocus need a cold period before they will bloom. This starts the biochemical process that makes them bloom. Bulbs are not like seeds where they can be viable for months without planting. Bulbs will dry out and are unlikely to bloom if they are not planted in the fall. Plant bulbs any time before the ground freezes.

Our seasonal shipment of high quality flower bulbs is here. Browse our huge selection of all of the favorites like daffodils, tulips and crocus.

31 Jul 2018

6th Annual Big Zucchini Contest

Who can grow the biggest zucchini in the Tetons? Can you beat the twelve pound record?
We’ll see on Saturday August 18th when our scale is the judge! Bring in your homegrown zucchini for judging between 9:00 am and noon on Saturday, August 18th. Zucchini must be grown in Teton County Idaho or Wyoming. Contest is free to enter and fun for all ages.

The contest winner earns bragging rights and a $50 MD gift card!
One entry per household please.

10 Jul 2018

What Bugs Us- spider mites

Spider Mites

Spider mites are common garden pests that feed on shrubs, trees, flowers, vegetables and even houseplants. These miniscule pests cause damage by bruising the plant’s tissues as they feed leading to mottled, brown foliage. Spider mites are difficult to see to the naked eye, but their presence can be detected by webbing on a plant and brown, mottled or dirty-looking foliage. To confirm the presence of spider mites, try holding a sheet of plain white paper below suspected plants. Tap or flick the foliage above the paper. Using a magnifying glass or the naked eye, watch for any tiny specs that move. These are mites. Outbreaks occur under dry conditions and can seriously injure or kill a plant. There are a few ways to control spider mites:
• Hosing: A strong jet of water can destroy webbing, knock down and kill spider mites.
• Beneficial Insects: Ladybugs, sold commercially, can also be released under mite-infested plants to feed on mites.
Avoiding strong insecticides such as those containing sevin, malathion and imidacloprid that kill mite’s natural enemies will actually help avoid mite infestations.
• Sulfur: This is often sold as a multipurpose spray such as Safer™ Brand 3 in 1 Garden Spray. Always follow the directions on the label.
• Horticultural Oil: This is possibly the best control available for the home gardener. The oil suffocates the eggs and the adults. Always follow the directions on the label.
Maintaining healthy plants will also help avoid mite infestations. Plants stressed by drought or lack of nutrients are prone to insect problems.

15 Jun 2018

Gardening with Kids

It’s nothing new, but we all know that children today are more prone than ever to stress, obesity and ADHD. Research has shown that kids with access to greenspace such as gardens on a daily basis have reaped many health benefits including increased attention span and deeper forms of creative play. Children who grow their own vegetables are more likely to eat them. How are parents to encourage kids to get outside and garden? Here are a few tips:

• Give a child their very own planting space to plant and dig as they please.
• Plant veggies kids like to eat such as carrots, sugar snap peas, strawberries and potatoes.
• Try planting crazy veggies like purple potatoes, atomic red carrots or dragon’s tongue beans.
• Create a theme garden. Popular themes include a pizza patch (see below), hummingbird habitat or a fairy garden.
• Invest in some basic pint- sized tools. Gloves, shovels and buckets are a good start.
• Incorporate some family- friendly features into your existing garden. Birdbaths, houses and feeders, gathering areas such as a dining set or bench, play areas such as a sandbox, fort or swing set.
• Involve your kids in harvesting. Kids love to pick peas, dig up potatoes, pull carrots and cut lettuce.
• Pass the scissors. Older children can cut some salad greens or some flowers to bring into the house.
• Hand them the hose! Very small kids are delighted to fill up a watering can and water something. Bigger kids can use the hose to fill birdbaths and water the veggie patch.
• Lead by example. Your kids are more likely to garden if you’re out there too!
• Make it fun. Great ideas can be found on our pinterest board, children’s gardening

RECIPE FOR A PIZZA GARDEN
Imagine a six foot wide pizza, cut into jumbo slices, outlined with a thick rock crust overflowing with your favorite toppings. The idea of a pizza garden begins with making the ‘pizza’. Either create a round bed with rocks and divide into slices or use another round vessel such as a kiddie pool (with drainage holes in the bottom!). Fill your ‘pizza’ with good quality planting soil and divide into slices. Use rocks or string to delineate the slices. Let the kids decide what kind of toppings they’d like to grow and add any or all of these ingredients. Plant your slices and water regularly. Plan a pizza party for the end of summer as the grand finale!

• tomato plants
• bell pepper plants
• zucchini plants
• rosemary plant
• oregano plants
• onion plants
• Orange marigold or calendula plants (as the ‘cheese’)
• Spinach seeds
• Arugula seeds
• Broccoli plants

06 Jun 2018

Flower Bed Maintenance

You’ve just purchased hundreds of dollars’ worth of plants, sweated and toiled to plant everything and now you get to sit back and relax and enjoy the fruits of your labor, right? Well yes, but to get the most out of your plants, some maintenance is key.
There is more to bed maintenance than just weeding:
Pre-Emergent:
Pre-Emergent herbicides prevent seeds from germinating. Applied early summer, pre-emergents can save you a lot of time weeding. Organic and synthetic pre-emergents are available. It’s important to note that they don’t kill existing weeds.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Fertilizer:
Fertilizing your plants will boost the health and appearance of your plants. Granular fertilizers can be applied once or twice a season. Liquid fertilizers can be applied throughout the growing season and are quickly absorbed to provide and immediate boost to your plants. We carry a wide variety of natural and synthetic fertilizers.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Mulch:
Mulch helps retain soil moisture, keeps weeds from germinating and helps regulate soil temperature. Most mulches we stock are forestry by-products like shredded and chipped bark. Rock or gravel can also be used as mulch, depending on the look you are trying to achieve.
Landscape Fabric:
Landscape Fabric is not a guarantee to keep weeds under control, but will help. Fabric must be completely covered with mulch for best results. Fabric around flowers, small plantings, and in small spaces can be more trouble than it’s worth. In this case, it’s better to use a thick layer of mulch without fabric. Come stop by our Nursery to see which type of landscape fabric would work best for you.
Pruning & Shaping:
Pruning and shaping trees and shrubs within your beds can be a great way to promote health in your plants. This practice also defines spaces between plants making your beds more attractive. As a general rule, prune anything dead, diseased or broken at any time. For blooming plants such as lilacs, prune after they bloom. Taking no more than one third off any plant at one time is the best practice. Always use clean, sharp tools and disinfect blades with a bleach solution or Lysol between cuts to prevent the spread of disease.

18 May 2018

Vegetable Gardening Basics Part 2

Now that your garden is growing, it’s time to maintain it for the best results!
WEED CONTROL

• Allow a bit of time daily to do a walk by your garden. This will help you notice any changes or problems that may arise.
• Mulching will help control weeds- use compost, dried grass, straw, or plastic.
• Hand pull weeds weekly before anything gets out of hand.
• A hoe or cultivator will help knock weeds down while they’re still small.
• For anything really tenacious use a chemical but try to keep it organic.

IRRIGATION

• Soaker hoses or drip lines on timers are the easiest.
• Getting out into the garden and hand watering every day is the best way to become aware of any weed or pest activity.

PESTS

Each season, an array of pests attack veggie gardens. Here are some of the common ones and treatment method. The products listed here are natural or organic controls.

• Flea beetles- These tiny insects are common on radish, arugula, lettuce and beans. If you’ve had trouble in the past, cover these crops soon after planting with row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard). Safer™ End All can be applied if they become a problem.
• Cabbage moths- Row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard) will keep these little white moths from laying eggs on cruciferous crops. A routine treatment of Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust) also helps.
• Cabbage Worms- Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust)
• Potato beetles- Spray with Safer™ End All or hand picking.
• Aphids- Knock them down with Safer™ Insecticidal Soap or a strong jet of water.

FERTILIZERS

As was mentioned in part 1, nutrient-rich soil is vital to productive veggie gardens. Adding compost or manure or some combination yearly will give you the best results.

Since veggies are heavy feeders, a routine application of fertilizer throughout the growing season is important for healthy plants and a bountiful harvest. We stock wide array of organic and conventional fertilizers available to the home gardener. A granular fertilizer can be added at planting time and will slowly feed throughout the season. Liquid fertilizers are fast acting and will need to be reapplied. By law, companies are required to list the N-P-K composition on their product. These will be listed as numbers such as 10-15-6.

• N-Nitrogen-Important for greening up.
• P-Phosphate-Important for rooting, blooming and fruiting.
• K-Potassium-Important for overall vigor.
• Micronutrients are also important for plant and soil health.

Always read the label before applying any kind of pesticide or fertilizer and follow the instructions precisely.

HARVESTING
It’s best to harvest veggies in the morning or during cool weather, so they will stay crisp and last longer.
Greens: Leaf lettuces, salad mixes, arugula and spinach varieties can be cut with scissors as soon as they’re 2 or more inches tall. Cut young kale, chard and beet greens to add to salads. Harvest these until they ‘bolt’ or flower. Once they have bolted, they will be bitter.
Beans and Peas: Pick these often and the plants will produce for longer.
Summer Squash: Cut off the vine while they’re still small for best flavor.
Tomatoes: pick as they ripen, but they will continue to ripen at room temperature off the vine. Pay attention to late summer and early fall temperatures and pick your tomatoes before they freeze.
Kale and Swiss chard: Can be harvested early summer for salads or late summer/ early fall for larger leaves.
Carrots, Beets and Potatoes: Most varieties are best harvested in the fall during cool, dry weather.
Cabbage: Harvest after a few frosts for best flavor.

You’ll find it hard to buy veggies from the store that match the flavor of home grown. With some patience, care and knowledge, you’ll be able to enjoy your bounty for years to come!