The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
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16 Sep 2019

Five Shrubs for Fall Color:

Dwarf Honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera): This could be the top of the list of under-used shrubs. Also known as northern bush honeysuckle and bush honeysuckle, this is a hardy native shrub of eastern North America. Though not a true honeysuckle, it has honeysuckle-like yellow flowers mid through late summer. Dwarf honeysuckle is very adaptable and can grow in full sun or partial shade. It grows 3-4 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide. The real show starts late August with gorgeous flush of bronze, orange and red. Plant several together for a striking fall color punch.

Peking Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster acutifolia): This is a large shrub, growing up to 8-10 feet tall and 6-8 feet wide. Native to Siberia, this shrub is extremely hardy and adaptable to many soil types. It is densely branched making it excellent as a screen or hedge. Dark green leaves turn orangey-red early fall. Tiny white flowers early summer form dark red berries that birds love. Hedge cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lucida) shares these same attributes and can be used interchangeably with Peking cotoneaster.

Amur Maple (Acer ginalla sp.): If you are searching for a bright red fall exclamation point, this is your ticket. Amur maple is a large multi-stemmed shrub that can grow up to 15 feet tall and wide. Amur maple is native to northern Russia and Eastern Mongolia and is extremely cold hardy. Glossy, deep green leaves through the summer develop intense red fall color in September. Amur maple varieties include ‘flame’ and ‘compact’.

Black Chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa): Pretty clusters of white flowers in the spring are followed by black berries later in the summer that attracts birds. Glossy green foliage becomes brilliant orange in autumn. Black chokeberry is adaptable to wet or dry soils but prefers full sun. Grows up to 6 feet tall and wide.

Dogwood (Cornus sericea sp.): Dogwoods deserve a special mention, not because of their fall foliage color, but because of the colorful stems that remain once the foliage has fallen for the season. Gorgeous red or yellow branches add color to any landscape fall through the winter months. A mainstay for landscapes in our region, these durable native shrubs make great wildlife habitat and are adaptable to sun or shade.

02 Sep 2019

September is for planting!

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:
Fall Specials: Fall is a great time to shop. Take advantage of sale pricing all month!

Less Stress: Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

Warm Ground Temperatures: Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.
Ready to Grow: Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

One Less Spring Project: Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant.

We offer a five-year warranty on trees and shrubs when you plant using Myke™. Ask our friendly garden center staff for details.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen. For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October. Fruit trees and crabapples are delicious winter food for voles and need to be protected before the snow flies. Stop by our greenhouse for trunk guards and repellant and help save the heartache of damaged and dead trees next spring.

16 Jul 2019

Creating Shade

Summers are precious here in the Tetons. Although we welcome the sunny days, sometimes the direct sun is just too hot to enjoy our outdoor spaces comfortably. With a few alterations to our outdoor spaces, we can create shade and enjoy summer comfortably.

Shade Cloth is a woven fabric ideal for cooling off greenhouses or dog kennels. Shade cloth is available in convenient rolls or bulk by the foot.

Shade Sails are a new trend that can cool off your outdoor space. Shade sails are handy over dining spaces and play areas. These triangular sails can be attached to houses, trees, posts, or any other sturdy overhead object. We carry Coolaroo™ shade sails in a variety of colors.

Trees are Mother Nature’s way of casting shade. By selecting the right species of tree and planting it in a strategic spot, trees offer shade during hot afternoons and evenings. Canopy trees, such as aspen, ash, maples, cottonwoods, crabapples and Canada red cherry are all potential choices. Spruce trees are also helpful but will cast shade year-round. Carefully consider the mature height and width of a tree before you plant.

Vines, once established, can also help create shade. They are useful when placed on a southern or western exposure of a deck and supported with a trellis. Hops vine, silver lace vine, Virginia creeper and honeysuckle vines are the most reliable climbers. Under the right conditions, (full sun, cool root zone) showy clematis can work well too. Vines need a few seasons for their roots to establish before they really start to gain vertical vigor.

08 Jul 2019

5 Ways to Repel Mosquitos

Although mosquitos are harmless to plants, they can be harmful to people and put a damper on outdoor living fun. You can help repel and reduce mosquito numbers around your home, making your time outdoors more enjoyable with these 5 strategies:

1) Drain water: Standing water is perfect mosquito breeding habitat. It only takes 6-10 days for mosquito eggs to become adults. Dump out plant saucers and other standing water in kiddie pools, buckets or tires. Refill pet water bowls and bird baths daily.

2) Mosquito Dunks: Mosquito dunks are a donut- shaped biological control that treats standing water. Dunks contain bacteria (bacillus thuringiensis or BT) that targets and kills insect larvae. Mosquito Dunks are useful for ditches, ponds and rain barrels.

3) Reduce Brush: Brush, tall grass and other overgrown vegetation can harbor mosquitoes. Trim and mow these areas periodically.

4) Mosquito Repellant Plants: Include plants that naturally repel mosquitoes into your outdoor living areas. Lemon-scented geranium, lemon balm, lavender, marigolds, catnip, lemon verbena, basil and mint not only deter mosquitoes, but look pretty too.

5) Citronella Candles: Easy to use citronella candles are useful in outdoor dining and living areas and help repel mosquitoes.
Besides the actions described above, it’s always a good idea to wear long, lightweight clothing and use insect repellent during mosquito season.

08 Apr 2019

Vole Damage in Lawns: what can I do?

The winter snowpack is melting and we are left with a mess covering our lawns. Voles have enjoyed had a nice long winter under a protective snow layer. Tunnels, dirt piles, grass clippings and droppings are all unsightly remains of vole damage. Voles do not hibernate but are active year-round, living between the soil surface and snow during the winter. They feed on bark, roots and grass. The damage has been done, now what?

Control the population:
There is no magic bullet here, but a combination of tactics seems work the best.
-Traps: Cheap and very effective, simple mouse traps placed perpendicular to active tunnels can do a lot to control the population. They work well without bait as the voles are habituated to run along their tunnels. Keep trapping (and emptying your traps-yuck!) until you notice fewer voles being caught.
-Habitat Reduction: Mow tall grasses or weedy areas in the fall. These areas are perfect cover for voles.
-Baits: A few are available to the homeowner. Always follow instructions carefully and be cautious when using in areas with kids or pets.
-Repellents: There are many commercially available repellents with varying formulas. They can be helpful, but need to be applied in intervals. Be sure to do a final application late fall for a longer effect through the winter.

Fix the damage:
It may be overwhelming at first, but lawns and grassy areas can bounce back from vole damage quite well. Once the snow has melted and the damaged area is no longer sodden, begin with raking up dead grass. Tamp down any raised dirt tunneling and reseed bare dirt with a lawn mix. Feed with lawn food and keep any newly-seeded areas damp. As the days lengthen and warm, existing grass will spread into damaged areas and new seed will germinate.

Vole populations are always changing. Natural predators such as hawks, skunks, foxes and owls are our allies against voles. Domestic dogs and cats can also help control vole populations. Our beautiful western landscape with its fields and meadows is home to voles. They will continue to be the bane of the rural homeowner and gardener, but it’s better than living in the city, right?

11 Mar 2019

Introducing Arbor Jet

There’s no question that mature trees are a valuable asset to any property. Trees provide shade, habitat for wildlife, screening, privacy and beauty. While many insects are harmless to trees, some insects like pine weevils can damage or even kill trees in any given growing season.
New this spring, our tree care crew will be using the Arbor Jet™ system to protect trees.
The Arbor Jet™ system is designed to deliver the needed product to defend against disease, harmful bacteria, and fungal infections while providing the necessary nutrients that trees need to promote health and longevity. The process starts by drilling small holes into the trunk of the tree. A quick jet device is inserted into each hole in the tree and the product is injected into the tree. The product is delivered through the tree’s vascular system and is transported from deep within the roots, to the tips of the leaves. When the quick jet is removed, the holes are sealed by a rubber plug and no insects or pathogens can enter. Some applications continue working in the tree for up to 2 years.
This process is most likely not for all trees in your property, but can protect those you value the most. This process is very effective, allowing for multiple applications in just one treatment. Arbor Jet™ is spray-free and waste-free since the product is delivered directly into the tree.
The MD tree care crew is proud to use this efficient and effective approach to protecting and improving the health of our trees.

11 Oct 2018

Tree Survival: An ounce of prevention

There is no doubt that trees are a valuable asset to our landscapes. Trees add beauty, privacy, wind protection and increase our property values. Most trees we sell are adapted to survive our harsh winters, but an additional measure of preventative care, especially with younger trees, will greatly increase survival over winter and into another successful growing season.
Protection from Animals:

Browsing mammals (moose, elk or deer):
If your trees are the most tender, greenest things on the block and other food sources are scarce, it is likely that these mammals will feed on your trees. Mature trees can withstand some browsing, but younger trees can be severely damaged or killed. Ultimately, a 7 to 8 foot fence surrounding your trees will provide the best protection. If fencing is not for you, commercially made repellents such as Plantskydd™ are very effective when applied correctly.
Voles:
Voles can girdle and kill a tree overwinter by chewing the bark around the base of the trunk. Apples and crabapples are especially vulnerable. A rigid plastic trunk guard can be placed around the trunk to protect it. Remove the trunk guard the following spring to allow for airflow.
plastic trunk guard keeps voles from girdling trees

Protection from Cold, Sun and Wind:
Believe it or not, our ample snow cover in the Teton region is a great insulator from extreme temperature swings. Severe cold injury can occur late fall when we have extreme cold but no snow cover. A two or three inch layer of bark mulch will help modify the ground temperature in this case. Mulch is also very useful to retain moisture and prevent weeds from germinating. Some deciduous trees like Maples are prone to having their bark crack over winter. Cracking is caused when the trunk heats up in the sun during the day and then cools off dramatically at night. The temperature difference cause vertical, spiraling cracks down the trunk. A light weight tree wrap will help protect the trunk. Wrap trunks late fall and remove the wrap in the spring.

Evergreen trees lose moisture as their needles transpire through the winter. New trees are not able to keep up with the rate of moisture loss because their root systems are not yet deep enough to uptake enough water over winter. This leads to sun burned needles. To help, ensure your evergreens go into winter WET! A thorough soaking each week will help your tree to fill up its reserves with water. Water evergreens until the snow is stuck on the ground or the ground remains frozen, usually though mid-November. An anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ can be sprayed on the needles mid to late October. Wilt Pruf™ helps slow down transpiration and can make the difference between brown, crispy needles or lush green needles next spring.

Our greenhouse has a full line of tree care products to help your trees survive the winter.
Need some help? From spraying to fencing, our maintenance department can do this for you!
Contact us for a quote: get a quote

31 Aug 2018

September is for Planting

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:
• Less Stress:
Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.
• Warm Ground Temperatures:
Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.
• Ready to Grow:
Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

• Fall Specials:
Fall is a great time to shop. Take advantage of sale pricing all month!

• One Less Spring Project:
Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.
Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen. For extra protection, spray new evergreens with the anti-desiccant, Wilt Pruf™ in October.

06 Jun 2018

Flower Bed Maintenance

You’ve just purchased hundreds of dollars’ worth of plants, sweated and toiled to plant everything and now you get to sit back and relax and enjoy the fruits of your labor, right? Well yes, but to get the most out of your plants, some maintenance is key.
There is more to bed maintenance than just weeding:
Pre-Emergent:
Pre-Emergent herbicides prevent seeds from germinating. Applied early summer, pre-emergents can save you a lot of time weeding. Organic and synthetic pre-emergents are available. It’s important to note that they don’t kill existing weeds.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Fertilizer:
Fertilizing your plants will boost the health and appearance of your plants. Granular fertilizers can be applied once or twice a season. Liquid fertilizers can be applied throughout the growing season and are quickly absorbed to provide and immediate boost to your plants. We carry a wide variety of natural and synthetic fertilizers.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Mulch:
Mulch helps retain soil moisture, keeps weeds from germinating and helps regulate soil temperature. Most mulches we stock are forestry by-products like shredded and chipped bark. Rock or gravel can also be used as mulch, depending on the look you are trying to achieve.
Landscape Fabric:
Landscape Fabric is not a guarantee to keep weeds under control, but will help. Fabric must be completely covered with mulch for best results. Fabric around flowers, small plantings, and in small spaces can be more trouble than it’s worth. In this case, it’s better to use a thick layer of mulch without fabric. Come stop by our Nursery to see which type of landscape fabric would work best for you.
Pruning & Shaping:
Pruning and shaping trees and shrubs within your beds can be a great way to promote health in your plants. This practice also defines spaces between plants making your beds more attractive. As a general rule, prune anything dead, diseased or broken at any time. For blooming plants such as lilacs, prune after they bloom. Taking no more than one third off any plant at one time is the best practice. Always use clean, sharp tools and disinfect blades with a bleach solution or Lysol between cuts to prevent the spread of disease.

09 May 2018

Hardscapes

More and more people are eager to expand their living space outside. A patio makes a great space to gather, dine, relax and enjoy the precious summer months. There are many options for hardscape patios to choose from depending on your budget: gravel surfaces, concrete, pavers and flagstone. Even within those categories there are many choices for color and texture. Water features, fire pits, outdoor kitchens, seating areas, boulder seats and wood structures such as pergolas can be added to customize a patio.
Our landscaping department has designed and installed hundreds of outdoor patio spaces for satisfied clients throughout the years. We have the area’s largest selection of pavers, stone, boulders and patio products. The grounds at MD has an array of installed pavers and flagstone samples. Homeowners are welcome to come and look at all we have to offer. It’s helpful to view products in person before making a decision.
Once the finished product is in place, selecting patio furniture and accents will really make the space feel like part of your home. This season we are excited carry the Ebel™ outdoor furniture line along with an, Durawood™ Adirondak chairs and an assortment of rockers, benches and bistro sets. Solar lanterns, garden art, pots of flowers and decorative cushions all add a personal finishing touch to a patio. A nice cold beverage of choice and some good company are all you need to complete your summer patio experience! Come in today or contact us for a quote https://mdlandscapinginc.com/get-a-quote/ and see what we have to offer.