The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
11 Oct 2018

Tree Survival: An ounce of prevention

There is no doubt that trees are a valuable asset to our landscapes. Trees add beauty, privacy, wind protection and increase our property values. Most trees we sell are adapted to survive our harsh winters, but an additional measure of preventative care, especially with younger trees, will greatly increase survival over winter and into another successful growing season.
Protection from Animals:

Browsing mammals (moose, elk or deer):
If your trees are the most tender, greenest things on the block and other food sources are scarce, it is likely that these mammals will feed on your trees. Mature trees can withstand some browsing, but younger trees can be severely damaged or killed. Ultimately, a 7 to 8 foot fence surrounding your trees will provide the best protection. If fencing is not for you, commercially made repellents such as Plantskydd™ are very effective when applied correctly.
Voles:
Voles can girdle and kill a tree overwinter by chewing the bark around the base of the trunk. Apples and crabapples are especially vulnerable. A rigid plastic trunk guard can be placed around the trunk to protect it. Remove the trunk guard the following spring to allow for airflow.
plastic trunk guard keeps voles from girdling trees

Protection from Cold, Sun and Wind:
Believe it or not, our ample snow cover in the Teton region is a great insulator from extreme temperature swings. Severe cold injury can occur late fall when we have extreme cold but no snow cover. A two or three inch layer of bark mulch will help modify the ground temperature in this case. Mulch is also very useful to retain moisture and prevent weeds from germinating. Some deciduous trees like Maples are prone to having their bark crack over winter. Cracking is caused when the trunk heats up in the sun during the day and then cools off dramatically at night. The temperature difference cause vertical, spiraling cracks down the trunk. A light weight tree wrap will help protect the trunk. Wrap trunks late fall and remove the wrap in the spring.

Evergreen trees lose moisture as their needles transpire through the winter. New trees are not able to keep up with the rate of moisture loss because their root systems are not yet deep enough to uptake enough water over winter. This leads to sun burned needles. To help, ensure your evergreens go into winter WET! A thorough soaking each week will help your tree to fill up its reserves with water. Water evergreens until the snow is stuck on the ground or the ground remains frozen, usually though mid-November. An anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ can be sprayed on the needles mid to late October. Wilt Pruf™ helps slow down transpiration and can make the difference between brown, crispy needles or lush green needles next spring.

Our greenhouse has a full line of tree care products to help your trees survive the winter.
Need some help? From spraying to fencing, our maintenance department can do this for you!
Contact us for a quote: get a quote

31 Aug 2018

September is for Planting

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:
• Less Stress:
Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.
• Warm Ground Temperatures:
Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.
• Ready to Grow:
Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

• Fall Specials:
Fall is a great time to shop. Take advantage of sale pricing all month!

• One Less Spring Project:
Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.
Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen. For extra protection, spray new evergreens with the anti-desiccant, Wilt Pruf™ in October.

06 Jun 2018

Flower Bed Maintenance

You’ve just purchased hundreds of dollars’ worth of plants, sweated and toiled to plant everything and now you get to sit back and relax and enjoy the fruits of your labor, right? Well yes, but to get the most out of your plants, some maintenance is key.
There is more to bed maintenance than just weeding:
Pre-Emergent:
Pre-Emergent herbicides prevent seeds from germinating. Applied early summer, pre-emergents can save you a lot of time weeding. Organic and synthetic pre-emergents are available. It’s important to note that they don’t kill existing weeds.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Fertilizer:
Fertilizing your plants will boost the health and appearance of your plants. Granular fertilizers can be applied once or twice a season. Liquid fertilizers can be applied throughout the growing season and are quickly absorbed to provide and immediate boost to your plants. We carry a wide variety of natural and synthetic fertilizers.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Mulch:
Mulch helps retain soil moisture, keeps weeds from germinating and helps regulate soil temperature. Most mulches we stock are forestry by-products like shredded and chipped bark. Rock or gravel can also be used as mulch, depending on the look you are trying to achieve.
Landscape Fabric:
Landscape Fabric is not a guarantee to keep weeds under control, but will help. Fabric must be completely covered with mulch for best results. Fabric around flowers, small plantings, and in small spaces can be more trouble than it’s worth. In this case, it’s better to use a thick layer of mulch without fabric. Come stop by our Nursery to see which type of landscape fabric would work best for you.
Pruning & Shaping:
Pruning and shaping trees and shrubs within your beds can be a great way to promote health in your plants. This practice also defines spaces between plants making your beds more attractive. As a general rule, prune anything dead, diseased or broken at any time. For blooming plants such as lilacs, prune after they bloom. Taking no more than one third off any plant at one time is the best practice. Always use clean, sharp tools and disinfect blades with a bleach solution or Lysol between cuts to prevent the spread of disease.

09 May 2018

Hardscapes

More and more people are eager to expand their living space outside. A patio makes a great space to gather, dine, relax and enjoy the precious summer months. There are many options for hardscape patios to choose from depending on your budget: gravel surfaces, concrete, pavers and flagstone. Even within those categories there are many choices for color and texture. Water features, fire pits, outdoor kitchens, seating areas, boulder seats and wood structures such as pergolas can be added to customize a patio.
Our landscaping department has designed and installed hundreds of outdoor patio spaces for satisfied clients throughout the years. We have the area’s largest selection of pavers, stone, boulders and patio products. The grounds at MD has an array of installed pavers and flagstone samples. Homeowners are welcome to come and look at all we have to offer. It’s helpful to view products in person before making a decision.
Once the finished product is in place, selecting patio furniture and accents will really make the space feel like part of your home. This season we are excited carry the Ebel™ outdoor furniture line along with an, Durawood™ Adirondak chairs and an assortment of rockers, benches and bistro sets. Solar lanterns, garden art, pots of flowers and decorative cushions all add a personal finishing touch to a patio. A nice cold beverage of choice and some good company are all you need to complete your summer patio experience! Come in today or contact us for a quote https://mdlandscapinginc.com/get-a-quote/ and see what we have to offer.

25 Apr 2018

Spring Fest Saturday, May 5th

Join us for the annual Spring Fest to celebrate the gardening season.
We’ll have $10 deals all day like selected $10 shrubs, trees, gift shop specials and more. Pottery and outdoor furniture will be 20% off for the day.

For the younger set, we’ll have a gardening project, face painting and a chance to visit with Teton Valley’s cutest baby farm animals. Face painting and animals are available from 11-2.

Great prizes will be raffled off throughout the event and we’ll have free gifts for our first 50 paying customers. This is one event you will not want to miss!

09 Apr 2018

Dogscaping: planning a dog-friendly landscape

We mountain people love our dogs and outdoor spaces. Dogscaping is intended as a way to be mindful of our dog’s needs while keeping our landscaped outdoor areas comfortable and beautiful for humans too. If you are planning your landscape from scratch, lucky you! Here is your chance to incorporate some dog-friendly ideas from the outset. If you already an established landscape, these tips can help keep that landscape beautiful and comfortable for your pets and you.

Dog-Friendly Zones:
Comfort Zones: Planting trees and shrubs for shade throughout your landscape will provide a cool spot to rest throughout the day. A patch of lawn or the cushion of durable ground cover plants make comfy places to relax. Bare dirt, stone walkways or a sunny deck provide opportunities to keep warm and soak up the sun.

Water Zone: At a minimum, provide a fresh supply of water for your dog outdoors. Water-loving breeds adore kiddie pools or natural water features for drinking and cooling off in hot weather. If you really want to spoil your dog, splurge on a commercially made pet fountain to provide cool fresh water at any time.

Potty Zone: Dogs will typically choose a spot to relieve themselves routinely. If you are introducing a new dog to your landscape or if you are planning a landscape from scratch, pick an area for your dog to go potty. It could be as simple as a weedy patch or as elaborate as a special gravel area with some upright ‘marking’ rocks. With some training and encouragement, dogs will return to their potty spot. Be sure to make this spot accessible in the wintertime too. An extra potty path through deeper snow will help your dog stay on track.

Pet Friendly Yard Care Products:
Choosing less toxic methods for pest or weed control is the best practice. There are plenty of effective, natural products on the market. Even if they are labeled natural or organic, it’s still important to keep your pets out of the product and only use products as directed on the label. Some dogs find organic fertilizers like bone meal or blood meal very attractive will eat or lick it off your plants. Be watchful and consider using liquid fertilizers that are absorbed more quickly.

Lawns and Groundcovers:
When cared for properly, turf grasses can withstand the traffic of playful dogs. Dogs love the cool and comfort of a lawn as much as humans do. What lawns do not love is the high concentration of nitrogen in dog urine. If your dog is continues to urinate repeatedly in the same spot, consider removing the turf altogether and replacing it with a gravel potty spot.
To correct urine kill spots, rake out the dead grass, fluff up the soil a bit, sprinkle with lime and reseed. Continue to water the patch consistently until the grass germinates. Commercially made dog spot treatment products are also an easy and effective way to fix dead spots.
Once established, many perennials can withstand the occasional run-though. Avoid planting anything with feathery, ferny foliage as these can quickly get trampled. Use fencing to keep dogs out of newly planted areas, highly valued flower beds or veggie gardens. Use traffic resistant ground covers like wooley thyme, creeping thyme, Irish moss, creeping jenny, snow in summer and lamb’s ears.

Keep them safe:
Toxic Plants: Most dogs will avoid toxic plants because they are usually unpalatable. It’s wise for their humans to be aware of which plants can cause trouble:
– Rhubarb
– Foxglove
– Iris
– Begonia
– Dahlia
– Monkshood
– Daffodils
– Tulips

Compost: If you compost at home, be sure to enclose it securely to protect your dog from eating it. The bacteria from decomposing food waste can cause an upset stomach or diarrhea.

Fun Ideas:
Ready to take dogscaping to the next level? Try one or more of these ideas:
Doggie pool or fountain: Installing a water feature with Fido in mind will keep him or her cool on hot days. If that’s not in your budget, a simple sprinkler set on low can be entertaining for some breeds.
Sensory log: Drill holes in an old log and fill with various essential oils or treats.
Designated dig spot: A sand box with buried toys or treats is a great way to occupy dogs who love digging.
Doggie ice lick: Simply fill a bigger yogurt or ice cream container with water and mix in some treats or toys. Perfect for hot days.

01 Nov 2017

Last-Chance Late Fall Tasks

It’s not too late to sneak in a couple of late fall tasks. Take advantage of any nicer November days to cross a few jobs off this list and prepare your landscape for winter and spring.
• Plant bulbs: As long as the ground is still workable, fall bulbs can still be planted. All fall bulbs are now 50% off.
• Spread wildflower and grass seed: Late fall is ideal for seeding. Seeds lay dormant and germinate next spring as the soil temperatures rise.
• Mow, fertilize and protect your lawn: A shorter final cut will reduce the amount of raking next spring. Spread fall fertilizer (such as Scott’s™) and a granular rodent repellant like Molemax™ if voles are a problem in your area.
• Hang and fill bird feeders: We carry a variety of birdfeeders and seed to attract a range of wild birds. Feeders placed near trees and shrubs will encourage more visiting birds since they like the protection of nearby branches.
– Cover tree trunks with tree guards to protect from voles and other gnawing critters. This is especially important for fruit trees.

04 Oct 2017

It’s October, Now What?

Leaves are dropping, the air is crisp, growing season is over and this is the month to prepare your landscape for winter and the next growing season. Taking the time to for some final chores really pays off.
October is Time to:

1) Plant bulbs: Wake up your garden next spring with colorful daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and tulips. Plant bulbs any time in October and enjoy pops of color for years to come.

2) Water: A cold dry fall can be deadly for many ornamental plants. Well-hydrated roots increase a plant’s chance of survival before our seasonal blanket of snow covers the ground. Water trees, shrubs and flower beds every week or two (depending on the weather) until the snow stays on the ground. Fall watering is especially important for evergreens as they continually loose moisture through their needles.

3) Spray evergreens with Wilt Pruf™: Wilt Pruf™ is an anti-desiccant that gets sprayed on evergreens late fall to protect from winter burn. Winter burn happens to newly planted evergreens that don’t have deep roots to draw moisture from. Evergreens continually transpire (give off water vapor) through their needles, even in winter. If a tree is unable to replenish the water in its needles, winter burn damage will result. Wilt Pruf™ coats needles with a clear film that slows transpiration resulting in less winter burn.

4) Spread wildflower and grass seed: Fall is the best time for seeding. Many wildflowers require a period of freezing temperatures to germinate. Wildflower and grass seed will lay dormant until spring.

5) Replenish veggie beds: Fall is a great time to ‘feed’ the soil in your veggie garden. After harvesting and cleaning up plant debris, spread a 2-4 inch layer of compost (we like Happy Frog or Black Gold) over top and work it into the top 6 inches or so with a spade or digging fork. Rake smooth and your beds will be ready to rock next season!
Note: Do this when the soil is dry to avoid a clumpy, muddy mess and to keep the soil from becoming compact.

6) Protect from critters: Protect trees and shrubs from browsing deer and moose by spraying with Plantskydd™ repellent and fencing with DeerBlock™. Plastic trunk protectors will keep chewing animals like voles from damaging the trunks of your trees. Broadcast a granular repellent like Repellex™ or Molemax™ over your lawn to reduce the tunneling of voles. Although these measures don’t guarantee a damage-free landscape, they can reduce the extent of winter damage.

7) Fertilize your lawn: A late application of fall lawn fertilizer will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and faster new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health.

Need some help? From spraying to fencing, our maintenance department can do it for you!
Click here to get a quote https://mdlandscapinginc.com/get-a-quote/

20 Sep 2017

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Throughout our region we are fortunate enough to encounter all kinds of wildlife. They inhabited this area first and we over took their migration paths and feeding grounds. As majestic as they are, moose, elk, deer and even buffalo can wreak havoc on newly planted and established landscapes. Big game animals tend to be in our neighborhoods in the fall, winter and spring. As the snow melts, they return to higher elevations for the summer months.
There are a few strategies to deter wildlife from our landscapes. Use these strategies alone or in combination to protect your valuable landscape from big game damage.

Use Wildlife-Resistant Plants:
No plant is ‘wildlife-proof’. If animals are starving, they will eat anything available. However, some plants tend to be less palatable to wildlife. If your home is in an area frequented by wildlife, avoid disappointment by choosing these plants:
• Spruce
• Buffaloberry
• Cotoneaster
• Juniper
• Lilac
• Potentilla
• Serviceberry
• Spirea
• Viburnum
• Hawthorne

Apples, crabapples, birch, willow, roses and dogwood are best avoided as these are preferred by wildlife.
For a complete list, click here: http://dev.mdlandscapinginc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/GardeningAroundDeer.pdf

Repellents:
Commercially made repellants such as Plantskydd™ are effective when applied as directed. Apply repellants at intervals throughout season for best results.

Scare Tactics:
Wildlife don’t like unfamiliar sounds, lights or movement. Lights on motion sensors or a well-trained barking dog can be helpful.

Predator Urine:
This is a natural way of keeping wildlife out of your yard. A few drops in placed in strategic areas around your property can keep game out for 1-3 weeks. Animals eventually get used to the scent and other tactics need to be used at this point. Available from predatorpee.com.

Wildlife Fencing:
A physical barrier has proved time and time again to be the most reliable way to keep big game away from your plants. Fence off individual trees, groups of trees or entire properties.

Dealing with wildlife can be tricky.  On one hand you want to protect the investment of your landscape while being as respectful to nature as possible. Being flexible and ready to use multiple strategies is often the best approach to dealing with wildlife on your property.

01 Sep 2017

5 Reasons to Plant Trees this Fall

 

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:

1)      Less Stress:

Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

2)      Warm Ground Temperatures:

Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.

3)      Ready to Grow:

Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

4)      Fall Specials:

Fall is a great time to shop. All container trees and shrubs are 20% off.

5)      One Less Spring Project:

Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen.  For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October.