The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
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04 Sep 2019

Garden Tomato Caprese Salad

Recipes from a Garden:
Garden Tomato Caprese Salad

After a summer of toil, a gardener’s great reward are THE best tomatoes in the world. We love this method as
one of the best and easiest ways to highlight your homegrown tomatoes!
-4 large tomatoes
-1 pound fresh mozzarella
– 6-8 fresh basil leaves, torn or chopped
– olive oil, for drizzling
– balsamic vinegar
-salt and pepper
Cut the tomato and mozzarella into thick slices. Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with basil. Drizzle with olive oil, a few splashes of balsamic and season with salt and pepper.

22 Jul 2019

Raspberry Rhubarb Crisp

Both raspberries and rhubarb thrive in the Tetons. This pairing is a delicious way to showcase these seasonal delights. Serve plain, with vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream.

Filling:
4 cups rhubarb, chopped
2 cups raspberries
½ cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
Topping:
¾ cup rolled oats
¾ cup brown sugar
½ cup flour
6 tablespoons butter, softened
Combine filling ingredients and pour into an 8” x 8” glass baking dish or oversized pie plate. Mix topping ingredients together and sprinkle over the filling. Bake at 375 for 45 – 60 minutes until filling is bubbling, thickened and topping is golden brown

05 Jun 2019

Recipes from the Garden: Simple Garden Salad

Simple Garden Salad

Salad greens are so easy to grow and a great choice for beginning gardeners. There are countless varieties to choose from including seed mixes and single varieties. Homegrown greens save money, packaging and have amazing flavor. For best results, follow directions on the seed package. Water lightly and continue to keep seed bed evenly moist for the best tasting greens. A simple vinaigrette is all you need to showcase your garden’s bounty.

You need:
1 quart washed salad greens
1-2 tablespoons of fresh, minced herbs such as dill, chives or basil, optional

Simple Salad Vinaigrette:
3 TBS olive oil
1 TBS vinegar (balsamic, red wine or white wine vinegar)
½ tsp Dijon mustard
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Combine all ingredients in a small jar and shake. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Toss vinaigrette gently with clean salad greens and herbs, if using.

15 Feb 2019

Three Sisters Garden

Early Native Americans traditionally planted corn, squash and beans together. These crops grew so well together that they became known as the Three Sisters. Here is a classic example of companion gardening where each plant helps another. The corn stalks provide a trellis for the beans to climb, the beans provide nitrogen for the corn and squash. The squash in turn provides protection for the beans and corn by shading the soil and discouraging pests with their spiny stems. Growing a Three Sisters garden would be an excellent lesson for kids about co-dependence and growing food.
This garden theme is fun with kids because the plants grow fast and they grow big. The seeds themselves are relatively large and easier for little hands to handle and plant. These veggies all like to grow in warm soil, so wait until the first or second week of June to start. This garden needs its own spot with good soil and full sun. To begin, build up a gently sloping mound of soil. Incorporate a granular vegetable fertilizer into the soil. Plant the corn seeds in the center. Wait a couple of weeks until the corn has grown up about 6 inches then surround the corn with bean seeds. Plant the squash seeds surrounding the corn and beans, on the sloping edge of the mound.
– Corn: Choose any short season variety or buy starts from a garden center.
– Beans: Pole beans are traditionally grown in this garden, but bush beans would be fine too. Sow seed directly into the prepared area.
– Squash: Zucchini and yellow summer squash are the easiest bets for our region. Sow from seed or buy starts from a garden center.

23 Jan 2019

The Snack Garden

Feeling a bit hungry? Just walk out to your Snack Garden and pluck a few berries or veggies. These foods can be foraged right from your yard and require little or no chopping, washing, cooking or fuss. Snacks from the garden don’t come in plastic wrappers and are 100% healthy. The best part though is the flavor. Home grown food just tastes better. This garden could be planted in a raised bed, containers, in a greenhouse or incorporated throughout your landscaping. From vine to mouth with little or no prep, this garden would fit the bill for a busy family.
Snack Garden plants:
My absolute must-haves are snap peas and cherry tomatoes, but any or all of these would make fine Snack Garden picks.
– Snap peas
-Broccoli
-Carrots
-Radishes
-Cherry tomatoes
-Berries (strawberries, raspberries, currants, gooseberries and serviceberries)
-Apples
The Set-Up:
This idea is very flexible depending on what you have in place or how extensive you’d like to go.
Most of the veggies will do best in a raised bed in full sun. Tomatoes grow well in big containers like an EarthBox™ or even a used plastic nursery pot. Strawberries and raspberries need a patch of their own to sprawl. Currants, gooseberries and serviceberries and apple trees can be planted throughout your existing landscaping or set apart in a place of their own.

17 Sep 2018

Backyard Apple Crisp

This homey, comforting dessert is a great way to showcase home-grown or farmer’s market apples.

Ingredients:
½ cup all-purpose flour
½ cup brown sugar
¾ cup old fashioned oats
½ tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
½ cup butter, softened
8-10 apples, peeled, cored and sliced
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Preheat oven to 375. Combine apples and lemon juice in a large bowl. Place into a buttered oversized pie plate or baking dish of your choice.
Combine all dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Using a pastry blender or your fingers, work in the butter until mixture is uniform.
Pat the crumble mixture over the apples and bake until topping is brown and the apples are tender and bubbly, about 40 – 50 minutes.
Serve with homemade whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

14 Jun 2018

Penne with Spinach

Spinach is one of the easiest greens to grow, often providing local gardeners with a bountiful harvest through June. Spinach loves cool weather and will begin to bolt, or flower once the temperatures climb. It’s best to pick spinach before bolting for the best flavor. Here’s is a simple, healthy and tasty way to include the harvest in your dinner!

Ingredients:
1 pound penne
3 garlic cloves
2 ounces goat cheese
1 ounce cream cheese
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
6 ounces fresh spinach leaves
2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan
Directions:
Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add the penne and cook until it is tender but still firm to the bite, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes.

Mince the garlic in a food processor. Add the goat cheese, cream cheese, 3/4 teaspoon of salt, 1/2 teaspoon of pepper, and half of the spinach leaves. Blend until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Set the cheese and spinach mixture aside.

Meanwhile, place the remaining spinach leaves in a large bowl.

Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Spoon the pasta atop the spinach leaves in the bowl. Scrape the cheese and spinach mixture over the pasta mixture and toss to coat, adding enough reserved cooking liquid to moisten. Season the pasta to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with Parmesan and serve.

Recipe adapted from foodnetwork.com

30 Jun 2017

Using Garlic Scapes

Garlic scapes are the flower stalks of garlic. Scapes grow in a curled fashion and have a little flower part at the tip. If you are growing garlic, remove the scapes for best bulb formation. If you are not growing garlic yourself, you may find these seasonal treasures at a local Farmer’s Markets or from a local CSA share. Garlic scapes have a texture similar to asparagus and taste like garlic, but less intense.  Take a little culinary adventure this month and try garlic scapes with any of these quick and easy preparations:

Chop the scapes into little coins and stir them into any recipe that calls for garlic like vinaigrettes, dips or stir fries.

Brush whole scapes with olive oil, season with salt and pepper and grill them whole until tender, about 5-10 minutes.

Chop a half pound of scapes into 2 inch segments. Stir fry in vegetable oil until just tender, about 5 minutes. Add a tablespoon of soy sauce and continue to cook until soy sauce is almost evaporated. Stir in 1 teaspoon of sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of sesame seeds. Stir until thoroughly coated and serve.

12 May 2017

5 Easy Herbs for Teton Gardens

 

Herbs are a great addition to a home garden. Combined with other flowers or in a spot of their own, these perennial herbs will perform reliably season after season. A sunny pot with decent soil good drainage is all they need. Not only can these be used in cooking, but they combine beautifully with other flowers and attract pollinating insects.  As an added bonus, voles, deer and gophers tend to leave them alone.

 

1-Oregano:  Grow this hardy perennial from seed or from starts. Oregano is fantastic in Mediterranean dishes. Small clusters of pink flowers bloom mid-summer and are nice as a cut flower.

2-Chives: Chives are a very versatile member of the onion family. These are easily started from seed. Pretty purple tufts top the slender green stalks. The flowers and stems are edible and the mild oniony flavor is nice in salads, soups, eggs, potato salad or anywhere you’d like a little punch of flavor.

3-Thyme:  This woody-stemmed perennial grows best in a well-drained sunny spot. There are many different varieties and all are edible but common or English thyme and lemon thyme are the best bets for cooking. Thyme is super versatile and can be used on its own alongside other herbs.

4-Mint: Mint is a very vigorous perennial and we recommend planting it on its own in a container or in a separate area of the garden. It spreads easily from underground roots. Use mint in salads, cocktails or steep the leaves for tea.

5-Sage: Sage has lovely pink flower spires atop its fragrant soft green leaves. It’s pretty enough to use in flower bouquets, but it is also wonderful with roasted potatoes, squash, chicken and turkey.

If you can’t use herbs fresh, try one of these simple techniques for preserving your herbs for later use:

DRYING:  This is best for herbs such as sage, oregano, thyme and mint. Tie herbs into bunches and hang to dry in a cool, dark spot. Herbs can also be laid flat in a cool dark spot. When leaves are completely brittle, they can be crumbled and stored in glass jars or in zip top bags.  Save some extras for holiday gift-giving.

FREEZING: Use a food processor and whiz clean herbs and a bit of water together. Pack into ice cube trays and freeze. Once the herb cubes are frozen, pop them out and store in a zip top freezer bag for later use.

VINEGAR INFUSION: This works well with most herbs and makes a beautiful gift. Put a few sprigs of herbs into a glass jar. Top with white wine vinegar and let steep for two weeks. Strain into a bottle or jar.

09 Mar 2017

Grow Your Own – sprouting 101

Grown your own sprouts indoors anytime of year.  These crunchy, tasty veggies are simply seeds that are soaked in water until they germinate. Sprouts aren’t just rich in vitamins and antioxidants,  they add flavor, color, texture and variety to any dishes you chose to sprinkle them on.  Try sprouts in salads, sandwiches on top of soups, eggs or in your next stir fry. There are many types of seeds that can be sprouted. Mung beans, broccoli, alfalfa, garbanzo beans, radishes or a mixture are all possibilities. Get your kids involved and let them chose which varieties to grow.   Kids love to see how quickly sprouts will sprout. With this hands on gardening activity, they may just chose to gobble them up too! With minimal time, effort and expense, home grown sprouts are about the easiest food crop you will ever grow.

 

Here’s how:

     First, choose seeds that have been labeled for sprouting. These have been lab-tested to ensure they are pathogen-free (We sell Botanical Interests™ seeds for sprouting).    Grow sprouts in a commercially-made sprouting tray ( We sell Botanical Interests™ Seed Sprouter) or in a clean quart-sized mason jar with a straining lid. Soak the seeds for 8-12 hours in water. Drain water and rinse seeds and  continue to rinse and drain seeds twice a day.  Depending on variety, the sprouts will be ready to eat in 3-7 days.   Finally, store drained sprouts in the fridge and plan to eat them within a few days.