The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
07 Aug 2019

August Tree Care

Between cold, snow, wind, hail and heat, it’s been an extra tough season for trees. Help your trees stay healthy with some routine care this month:

Water:
We’re often asked how much water to give a tree in a week. Soils, tree species, size and maturity will affect water requirements, but one rule of thumb is 10 gallons of water weekly for every inch of trunk diameter. For example, if you have a 6-inch spruce tree, your tree will need 60 gallons of water each week. Newly planted trees will need more water than established trees until their roots are able to grow beyond its original root ball.
It’s better to soak trees deeply less often than to water frequently. A long and thorough soaking wets beyond the root zone and encourages deep rooting. These deep roots are important for surviving stress, insect pressure and drought.

Mulch:
Mulch applied around the base of trees helps with weed reduction and moisture retention. In our region bark mulch is widely available is an economical and effective mulch. Apply a two or three-inch deep layer of mulch around the base of the tree. Be careful not to pile mulch up the trunk like a volcano, but pull the mulch slightly away from the trunk into more of a flat donut shape around the base.

Weed Control:
Weeds and grass will compete for a tree’s nutrients and water. Pull weeds and grasses manually or carefully spot spray with a non-selective weed killer such as Pulverize™ or Killzall™.

Routine Inspection:
Make a habit of checking trees routinely. Look for any damage and signs of stress such as wilted, discolored or dead leaves. Inspect the trunk for any holes, oozing or sawdust. If you see something unusual, take a closer look for insects. For help troubleshooting problems, collect a sample, snap a picture and bring it to us at the nursery for help.

Fertilizer:
It’s best to wait until late fall or early spring to fertilize. Encouraging new growth at this time of year puts extra stress on a tree. An exception would be a mild root stimulator used at planting time for new trees.

01 Aug 2019

August Outdoor Living Event

Gather up your friends and family and enjoy the final full month of summer in style. Stop by and scoop up deals on outdoor furniture including Adirondack chairs, benches, rockers and dining sets. Personalize your outdoor space with lighting, kinetic spinners or a cozy fire pit.

• 30 % off outdoor furniture
• 30% off outdoor lighting & solar lanterns
• 30% off tiki torches
• 30% off fire pits
• 50% off kinetic spinners
• $20 selected outdoor cushion sets

22 Jul 2019

Raspberry Rhubarb Crisp

Both raspberries and rhubarb thrive in the Tetons. This pairing is a delicious way to showcase these seasonal delights. Serve plain, with vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream.

Filling:
4 cups rhubarb, chopped
2 cups raspberries
½ cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
Topping:
¾ cup rolled oats
¾ cup brown sugar
½ cup flour
6 tablespoons butter, softened
Combine filling ingredients and pour into an 8” x 8” glass baking dish or oversized pie plate. Mix topping ingredients together and sprinkle over the filling. Bake at 375 for 45 – 60 minutes until filling is bubbling, thickened and topping is golden brown

16 Jul 2019

Creating Shade

Summers are precious here in the Tetons. Although we welcome the sunny days, sometimes the direct sun is just too hot to enjoy our outdoor spaces comfortably. With a few alterations to our outdoor spaces, we can create shade and enjoy summer comfortably.

Shade Cloth is a woven fabric ideal for cooling off greenhouses or dog kennels. Shade cloth is available in convenient rolls or bulk by the foot.

Shade Sails are a new trend that can cool off your outdoor space. Shade sails are handy over dining spaces and play areas. These triangular sails can be attached to houses, trees, posts, or any other sturdy overhead object. We carry Coolaroo™ shade sails in a variety of colors.

Trees are Mother Nature’s way of casting shade. By selecting the right species of tree and planting it in a strategic spot, trees offer shade during hot afternoons and evenings. Canopy trees, such as aspen, ash, maples, cottonwoods, crabapples and Canada red cherry are all potential choices. Spruce trees are also helpful but will cast shade year-round. Carefully consider the mature height and width of a tree before you plant.

Vines, once established, can also help create shade. They are useful when placed on a southern or western exposure of a deck and supported with a trellis. Hops vine, silver lace vine, Virginia creeper and honeysuckle vines are the most reliable climbers. Under the right conditions, (full sun, cool root zone) showy clematis can work well too. Vines need a few seasons for their roots to establish before they really start to gain vertical vigor.

08 Jul 2019

5 Ways to Repel Mosquitos

Although mosquitos are harmless to plants, they can be harmful to people and put a damper on outdoor living fun. You can help repel and reduce mosquito numbers around your home, making your time outdoors more enjoyable with these 5 strategies:

1) Drain water: Standing water is perfect mosquito breeding habitat. It only takes 6-10 days for mosquito eggs to become adults. Dump out plant saucers and other standing water in kiddie pools, buckets or tires. Refill pet water bowls and bird baths daily.

2) Mosquito Dunks: Mosquito dunks are a donut- shaped biological control that treats standing water. Dunks contain bacteria (bacillus thuringiensis or BT) that targets and kills insect larvae. Mosquito Dunks are useful for ditches, ponds and rain barrels.

3) Reduce Brush: Brush, tall grass and other overgrown vegetation can harbor mosquitoes. Trim and mow these areas periodically.

4) Mosquito Repellant Plants: Include plants that naturally repel mosquitoes into your outdoor living areas. Lemon-scented geranium, lemon balm, lavender, marigolds, catnip, lemon verbena, basil and mint not only deter mosquitoes, but look pretty too.

5) Citronella Candles: Easy to use citronella candles are useful in outdoor dining and living areas and help repel mosquitoes.
Besides the actions described above, it’s always a good idea to wear long, lightweight clothing and use insect repellent during mosquito season.

14 Jun 2019

Garden Terminology: tomatoes, berries and fruit

Growing your own food is so satisfying, but the terminology associated with it can get confusing. Here’s a brief look at some common terms and what they mean:

TOMATOES
Determinate: These tomatoes are more compact and bear fruit that will ripen all at the same time. Good for small spaces and people who like to use tomatoes for canning (salsa, tomato sauce, ketchup, etc…)
Indeterminate: These tomatoes grow and grow and grow. They bear fruit that ripens throughout the growing season. These plants will eventually need to be staked or grown in a tomato cage. Good for people who want a continuous, but smaller harvest.

STRAWBERRIES
Everbearing: These allow you to harvest berries all summer long, producing a spring crop and continuing to bear throughout the growing season. Fort Laramie and Ozark Beauty strawberries are everbearing.
Junebearing or Summerbearing: These berries produce one large crop in the month of June. Good for people who want berries for freezing or making jam.

RASPBERRIES
Summerbearing: Will produce one big crop in the summer. Kilarney and Latham are examples.
Fallbearing or Everbearing: These raspberries produce their biggest crop in the late summer. Some varieties also produce earlier in the summer. Fall Gold and Heritage are examples.

APPLES, PEARS, CHERRIES and PLUMS:
Self- sterile: These trees require another variety to pollinate them to bear fruit. Apples, pears and plums are self-sterile.
Self-fruitful: These trees do not require another variety to bear fruit. Cherries are self-fruitful.

05 Jun 2019

Recipes from the Garden: Simple Garden Salad

Simple Garden Salad

Salad greens are so easy to grow and a great choice for beginning gardeners. There are countless varieties to choose from including seed mixes and single varieties. Homegrown greens save money, packaging and have amazing flavor. For best results, follow directions on the seed package. Water lightly and continue to keep seed bed evenly moist for the best tasting greens. A simple vinaigrette is all you need to showcase your garden’s bounty.

You need:
1 quart washed salad greens
1-2 tablespoons of fresh, minced herbs such as dill, chives or basil, optional

Simple Salad Vinaigrette:
3 TBS olive oil
1 TBS vinegar (balsamic, red wine or white wine vinegar)
½ tsp Dijon mustard
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Combine all ingredients in a small jar and shake. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Toss vinaigrette gently with clean salad greens and herbs, if using.

22 May 2019

Flower Care 101

The flowers you purchase from our greenhouse are used to a warm and humid environment and receive routine care. For success beyond our care, follow these simple steps for beautiful blooms all summer long:
Note: this guide refers to flowering annuals and hanging baskets.
• Be careful not to cook new plants in your car. Take them home straight away or if you have to make stops, park in the shade and keep some windows cracked. At home, keep new plants in a sheltered, shady spot and give them some water if they’re dry or wilted.
• Gradually expose newly purchased plants to the outdoors on a covered porch or in a shady spot out of the wind. This is called hardening off.
• Watch the weather. A few annuals, such as pansies will tolerate freezing temperatures, but most will need to be covered or moved inside if a frost is predicted.
• Plant in high-quality potting mix in a container with drainage holes. If the plants are to be planted in last year’s container, remove all former plant material and refresh with new soil. Adding granular fertilizer to the soil prior to planting will promote continual blooming and healthy root formation. We love Osmocote™ slow release fertilizer.
• Water needs will vary depending on the size and type of container, sun and wind exposure. The soil should never be allowed to dry out. Feel the soil daily to check if it’s dry. Water thoroughly until you can see water coming out of the drainage holes. Depending on sun and wind exposure, annuals may need water up to twice a day.
• Routine removal of spent flowers will encourage more blooming. This is called deadheading. Be sure to remove the entire flower and stem.
• Additional liquid fertilizer (such as Fertilome™ brand Blooming & Rooting) beginning midsummer will maintain lush foliage and continuous blooming.

06 May 2019

De-mystifying Fertilizers:

Routine applications of fertilizer promote healthy growth in lawns, trees, shrubs, veggie gardens and flower beds. A stop at our garden center reveals many choices and brands of fertilizers. Why so many choices, what do they all do? Here are some fertilizer basics and guidelines to help make an informed choice.

What’s in Fertilizer?
Three main chemical elements are found in all mixed fertilizers:
N = Nitrogen promotes healthy leaf growth by stimulating the production of chlorophyll (the main chemical involved in photosynthesis).
P = Phosphorus helps with the development of roots, stems, blossoms, and fruits.
K = Potassium for overall health and vigor, helps plants digest and manufacture their foods.
These elements are listed in this sequence on the label of all fertilizers. Complete fertilizers will have some of each element, for example, 5-10-5. A balanced fertilizer will have about the same portion of each, for example, 15-15-15. Specialty fertilizers may have a greater portion of one of these elements, to support a specific kind of growth. Lawn fertilizers, for example, will be high in Nitrogen (N) for lush, leafy growth. Fertilizers for flowers or fruiting plants like veggies will have a higher middle number (P) like 10-15-10.
There are also a variety of minerals in fertilizers such as iron, calcium, copper, and magnesium that may be part of a given fertilizer’s composition. These will be listed on the label.

Liquid vs Granular Fertilizer:
Each has its own uses depending on the plants’ needs. Liquid fertilizers provide immediate nutrition to a plant. Liquids are perfect for plants that need a quick pick-up.
Granular Fertilizers provide nutrients that take longer to be absorbed into the plants’ tissues. These are great for spring applications to last well into the growing season.
Organic vs Conventional: The main difference between organics and conventional fertilizer is the source of the nutrients. Organics are derived from animal and plant waste. The N-P-K ratio of organics will be much lower than that of synthetic fertilizers and are slower acting. For this reason, it is less likely to ‘burn’ plants using organic fertilizer. Organics often benefit the soil as well as the plants. Conventional fertilizers are manufactured synthetically using chemical processes. Synthetic fertilizers are faster acting, less expensive and generally have higher N-P-K ratios.

When to fertilize:
There’s no point fertilizing plants unless they’re actively growing. Veggies, trees, shrubs and flowers will all reward you with lush, healthy growth for feeding them a balanced granular fertilizer in the spring. Lawns benefit from spring fertilizer as well as summer and late fall for continued green, leafy growth. Hanging baskets and flowering annuals like the regular addition of liquid fertilizer mid- July through September. Bulbs need fertilizer at planting time in the fall.
How to apply: Liquid fertilizers can be mixed in a large bucket or watering can and applied all over the plant, including the foliage and root zone.
Granular fertilizers can be placed in a spreader for larger areas like lawns and flower beds or can be measured out and sprinkled around the base of each individual plant. Brush any granular fertilizer from the leaves so they don’t burn.

More is not better in the case of fertilizer. Over-applying can lead to spindly growth or can burn the plants. Avoid applying fertilizer in the heat of the day and water thoroughly after applying granular fertilizer.
It is up to the user to read the product instructions and follow them precisely.