The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
11 Oct 2018

Tree Survival: An ounce of prevention

There is no doubt that trees are a valuable asset to our landscapes. Trees add beauty, privacy, wind protection and increase our property values. Most trees we sell are adapted to survive our harsh winters, but an additional measure of preventative care, especially with younger trees, will greatly increase survival over winter and into another successful growing season.
Protection from Animals:

Browsing mammals (moose, elk or deer):
If your trees are the most tender, greenest things on the block and other food sources are scarce, it is likely that these mammals will feed on your trees. Mature trees can withstand some browsing, but younger trees can be severely damaged or killed. Ultimately, a 7 to 8 foot fence surrounding your trees will provide the best protection. If fencing is not for you, commercially made repellents such as Plantskydd™ are very effective when applied correctly.
Voles:
Voles can girdle and kill a tree overwinter by chewing the bark around the base of the trunk. Apples and crabapples are especially vulnerable. A rigid plastic trunk guard can be placed around the trunk to protect it. Remove the trunk guard the following spring to allow for airflow.
plastic trunk guard keeps voles from girdling trees

Protection from Cold, Sun and Wind:
Believe it or not, our ample snow cover in the Teton region is a great insulator from extreme temperature swings. Severe cold injury can occur late fall when we have extreme cold but no snow cover. A two or three inch layer of bark mulch will help modify the ground temperature in this case. Mulch is also very useful to retain moisture and prevent weeds from germinating. Some deciduous trees like Maples are prone to having their bark crack over winter. Cracking is caused when the trunk heats up in the sun during the day and then cools off dramatically at night. The temperature difference cause vertical, spiraling cracks down the trunk. A light weight tree wrap will help protect the trunk. Wrap trunks late fall and remove the wrap in the spring.

Evergreen trees lose moisture as their needles transpire through the winter. New trees are not able to keep up with the rate of moisture loss because their root systems are not yet deep enough to uptake enough water over winter. This leads to sun burned needles. To help, ensure your evergreens go into winter WET! A thorough soaking each week will help your tree to fill up its reserves with water. Water evergreens until the snow is stuck on the ground or the ground remains frozen, usually though mid-November. An anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ can be sprayed on the needles mid to late October. Wilt Pruf™ helps slow down transpiration and can make the difference between brown, crispy needles or lush green needles next spring.

Our greenhouse has a full line of tree care products to help your trees survive the winter.
Need some help? From spraying to fencing, our maintenance department can do this for you!
Contact us for a quote: get a quote

01 Oct 2018

20th Annual Fall Fest

Our 20th annual Fall Fest is Saturday, October 20th from 12-3.

The MD tradition of free family fun for our community continues for our 20th year! Celebrate the season with games, pumpkin painting, a photo booth, hayrides, face painting and a mini Farmer’s Market. Bakers can show off their skills in the Pumpkin Pie Bake-Off upstairs at Marigold Café. Pie judging is at 3:00.
To celebrate our 20th Fall Fest, we’ll have $20 one day only specials you won’t want to miss!

We’ll be accepting donations to support the Teton Valley Education Foundation at the pumpkin painting activity. Bring some cash and support this valuable community resource!

17 Sep 2018

Backyard Apple Crisp

This homey, comforting dessert is a great way to showcase home-grown or farmer’s market apples.

Ingredients:
½ cup all-purpose flour
½ cup brown sugar
¾ cup old fashioned oats
½ tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
½ cup butter, softened
8-10 apples, peeled, cored and sliced
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Preheat oven to 375. Combine apples and lemon juice in a large bowl. Place into a buttered oversized pie plate or baking dish of your choice.
Combine all dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Using a pastry blender or your fingers, work in the butter until mixture is uniform.
Pat the crumble mixture over the apples and bake until topping is brown and the apples are tender and bubbly, about 40 – 50 minutes.
Serve with homemade whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

10 Sep 2018

Lawn Aeration

 

Does your lawn need a quick improvement? Aeration can elevate the health and appearance of your lawn. Aeration is the process where a machine (lawn aerator) penetrates the lawn surface and pulls out small plugs of soil. Aeration is often confused with power-raking or de-thatching, but it’s different. Hollow tines are equipped on the lawn aerator which removes soil plugs and leaves them on the surface of the lawn. These plugs are normally visible for a couple of weeks before they decompose. There are no benefits of removing the soil plugs outside of aesthetics.
Most lawns are compacted over time by foot traffic, play, and maintenance equipment. Aeration allows nutrients, oxygen and water to get down into the soil. It’s harder for oxygen, nutrients, and water to penetrate compacted soils. The plugs removed by aeration loosens compacted soils, cuts through the thatch layer and creates openings for nutrients, water and air flow. These are all key components for healthy green grass. The healthier the roots are below, the better the grass will look above.
Core aeration is one of the best things you can do for your lawn to keep it lush and green. In our area, Spring and Fall are the best times to aerate.
Lawn aerators can be rented locally from Valley Lumber in Victor and Grande Rental in Driggs.
If DIY isn’t your thing, we can do it for you. Click here to get a quote: https://mdlandscapinginc.com/get-a-quote/

07 Sep 2018

5 Reasons to Plant Bulbs this Fall

1- Bulbs are Beautiful:
Vibrant colors, fragrance and eye appealing combinations make bulbs one of the most charming flowers of the spring.

2- Bulbs are Easy to Plant:
Plant them once, and you’ll be rewarded with color year after year. Simply choose a sunny spot with well-drained soil. Dig a hole two to three times the bulb’s height (for example if a bulb is two inches tall, dig a hole four to six inches deep). Sprinkle the bottom of the hole with bulb food or bone meal and place the bulb pointy side up. Cover with soil, water once and wait for spring! To plant bigger clumps of bulbs, follow the same method as above but make a wider hole and place multiple bulbs into the same hole. This ‘mass grave’ method saves a ton of time and bigger clumps of bulbs will make more of a visual impact than a scattering of single bulbs.

3- Bulbs Will Make You Happy:
Imagine a warm spring day after months of seeing mostly snow, ice and mud. You walk outside and ta-da! A pretty clump of purple crocus are blooming right next to the receeding snow. Studies have shown that flowers release the ‘happy’ brain chemicals triggering positive emotions. Plant bulbs to plant happiness!

4- Bulbs Feed the Pollinators:
Yes, bulbs are wonderful for spring color, but did you know that flowering bulbs are also a valuable food source for bees? Bulbs are one of the first available pollen sources for bees and other pollinating insects.

5- Bulbs Need to be Planted in the Fall:
All spring-blooming bulbs like daffodils, tulips and crocus need a cold period before they will bloom. This starts the biochemical process that makes them bloom. Bulbs are not like seeds where they can be viable for months without planting. Bulbs will dry out and are unlikely to bloom if they are not planted in the fall. Plant bulbs any time before the ground freezes.

Our seasonal shipment of high quality flower bulbs is here. Browse our huge selection of all of the favorites like daffodils, tulips and crocus.

31 Aug 2018

September is for Planting

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:
• Less Stress:
Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.
• Warm Ground Temperatures:
Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.
• Ready to Grow:
Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

• Fall Specials:
Fall is a great time to shop. Take advantage of sale pricing all month!

• One Less Spring Project:
Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.
Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen. For extra protection, spray new evergreens with the anti-desiccant, Wilt Pruf™ in October.

31 Jul 2018

6th Annual Big Zucchini Contest

Who can grow the biggest zucchini in the Tetons? Can you beat the twelve pound record?
We’ll see on Saturday August 18th when our scale is the judge! Bring in your homegrown zucchini for judging between 9:00 am and noon on Saturday, August 18th. Zucchini must be grown in Teton County Idaho or Wyoming. Contest is free to enter and fun for all ages.

The contest winner earns bragging rights and a $50 MD gift card!
One entry per household please.

20 Jul 2018

Choosing the Right Perennials

Perennials are flowers that return each season by growing up from their roots. These flowers add beauty and value to any landscape. From the scents, colors, textures, sizes, and shapes, perennials offer so much. They can also attract hummingbirds, butterflies, bees and curiosity. Many varieties are great for cutting to bring into your home or to offer as gifts. In order to make sure you have the right perennials selected for your gardens here are a few ideas to help you get started:

Know what zone you live in. A simple google search with your zip code will tell you your USDA plant climate zone, but in Teton County Idaho & Wyoming we are primarily zones 3 and 4. Plant zones help as a starting point, but there are many microclimates, soils, and wildlife pressures that can affect the success of any plant.

Be an observer and take note of flowers and colors you like and dislike. Mother Nature has perfected color combinations and inspiration can be drawn from fields of flowers you see along local mountain trails.

Consider the location of where you want to plant flowers and observe that spot before planting anything. Is the spot shady but with intense heat at the end of the day? Is the location hot and windy? Do you have a way to deliver water? Does the area drain correctly or does water pool? Are there nearby rodent populations that are hungry to gobble up your prized flowers? Being observant before your shop for plants will help alleviate the heartache and frustration of planting something you love in the wrong spot.

Few perennials bloom all season long, so it’s best to grow a variety with different bloom times for season-long color. As some perennials are finished blooming, others will be just starting and you can have something in flower from April until September. Observing your own garden or others will give you an idea if you’re are lacking color at one point in the season. Don’t forget to plant flowering bulbs like daffodils and crocus for pops of early season color.

The last thing to consider is the mature size of the plant. Taller plants usually are best at the back of your garden while the short perennials are great for borders. Don’t be tempted to crowd new plants too close together. This will lead to a maintenance nightmare a few years down the road. It’s good to consider how you might view your flowers from different vantages on your property (from the driveway, looking from the inside out, etc). Accounting for the final size of your plants before planting will leave you with a visually pleasing display.

With all of this in mind it can be sometimes very confusing on which perennials to choose. Our friendly staff can help guide you through the choices and set you up for a beautiful flower garden that you can enjoy for years to come!

10 Jul 2018

What Bugs Us- spider mites

Spider Mites

Spider mites are common garden pests that feed on shrubs, trees, flowers, vegetables and even houseplants. These miniscule pests cause damage by bruising the plant’s tissues as they feed leading to mottled, brown foliage. Spider mites are difficult to see to the naked eye, but their presence can be detected by webbing on a plant and brown, mottled or dirty-looking foliage. To confirm the presence of spider mites, try holding a sheet of plain white paper below suspected plants. Tap or flick the foliage above the paper. Using a magnifying glass or the naked eye, watch for any tiny specs that move. These are mites. Outbreaks occur under dry conditions and can seriously injure or kill a plant. There are a few ways to control spider mites:
• Hosing: A strong jet of water can destroy webbing, knock down and kill spider mites.
• Beneficial Insects: Ladybugs, sold commercially, can also be released under mite-infested plants to feed on mites.
Avoiding strong insecticides such as those containing sevin, malathion and imidacloprid that kill mite’s natural enemies will actually help avoid mite infestations.
• Sulfur: This is often sold as a multipurpose spray such as Safer™ Brand 3 in 1 Garden Spray. Always follow the directions on the label.
• Horticultural Oil: This is possibly the best control available for the home gardener. The oil suffocates the eggs and the adults. Always follow the directions on the label.
Maintaining healthy plants will also help avoid mite infestations. Plants stressed by drought or lack of nutrients are prone to insect problems.

29 Jun 2018

Water-Wise Irrigation Systems

Irrigation systems are a convenient and important landscape feature for a busy homeowner. An automated system allows for a lush, healthy and beautiful landscape. However, it can be easy to ‘set it forget it’ and not pay attention to the needs of your valuable plants. Overwatering and poor water management tend be the side effect to these great systems.

Overwatering is caused by running the sprinklers too long. It’s easy to let them run for an extra 10 minutes… just to make sure they are doing a good job. Most times the excess water will run off or puddle. The process of correct watering can be perfected on a trial and error basis. Run your sprinklers less and less every week and see when your lawn starts to yellow or stress. Once you have found this spot, increase the irrigation time to find your lawn’s happy place. There is a spot on most irrigation controls called seasonal adjustments. This is where you can increase the watering time in the summer and lower the watering in the spring and fall. Most irrigation controllers also offer a spot to plug in a rain sensor. This efficient feature automatically shuts down the sprinklers when it’s raining, allowing Mother Nature to water for you. If you notice that water is running down your sidewalk, driveway, or curbs you know you are watering too much. Soils can only hold so much water before the excess is puddling or running off.

Different areas of your landscape will require different amounts of water depending on sun and wind exposure. It’s important to know where these areas are in reference to the zones on your sprinkler system. Running your sprinklers is best done in the evening hours… dusk to dawn. If sprinklers run during the day or when the sun is out, a portion of that water will be lost to evaporation. Avoid water waste and set your controller to late PM or early AM. Walk through and check on your landscaping regularly and take note of dry or wet areas. This is a good indication that your sprinkler heads are not working properly. Over time, heads will fall out of adjustment or have plants grow in front of their spray coverage. A few simple corrections to the sprinkler heads will keep your system running at peak efficiency.

Winterizing your system at the end of the summer is important otherwise water lines and sprinkler heads will freeze and crack. A powerful compressor is used to blow all the water out of the irrigation system, which protects it for the winter. Late September and early October is the best time to winterize your system.
Sprinkler systems are great for saving time and can be a very efficient way to deliver water to your valuable landscape. Be sure to check your system regularly throughout the summer and make adjustments as needed.

More Water-Wise Tips:
• Water early in the morning or in the evening. This reduces water loss to evaporation.
• If you are limited to how much water is available, prioritize water needs. Vegetable gardens and newly planted trees and shrubs require the most water. Turf grasses can be allowed to go dormant (brown) with less water. These grasses will green up once again when cooler weather returns.
• Cut back perennials that are done blooming. This redirects a plant’s energy to its roots instead of seed production.
• Water deeply, less often. A thorough soaking will promote deep rooting. Frequent light watering leads to shallow, drought-prone roots.
• Move planters and hanging baskets into the shade.
• Recognize drought-stress: Wilting is the most obvious sign. Brown or crispy tips or edges of leaves are another.
• Pay special attention to newly planted evergreens. These thirsty trees may not show signs of stress until months later, when it’s too late. Check your irrigation and probe down into the soil to ensure water is reaching the root zone.
• Mulch is your friend. Applying a three inch layer around trees, shrubs and perennial flowers will help retain soil moisture and suppress weeds.