The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
04 Nov 2020

What Happens in November?

November at MD Nursery
With more of us staying at home this season, November is a good time to stop in our gift shop to see what’s new and give your home a seasonal touch up for Thanksgiving and the winter ahead. Find fresh table linens, serving pieces, candles, room diffusers, decorative pillows, rugs, baskets, or a cozy throw blanket. Add fresh flowers, indoor flower bulbs or a new houseplant for an element of living beauty in your home.

November is the month where we transition our gift shop and greenhouse into holiday mode. There will be lots of changes in the first few weeks as we bring in our seasonal decorations to prepare for the holiday season.

Early bird holiday shoppers should check on our clearance corner to scoop up deals on past-season or discontinued items. Our gift shop is filling up with toys, baby gifts, lotions, soaps, candles, jewelry, seasonal kitchen linens and tableware, mugs, cozy scarves, artwork, doormats and so much more.
As always, we offer complimentary gift wrapping for the holidays or any occasion.

Fresh cut and live potted Christmas trees, poinsettias, wreaths, garland, and seasonal greenery will be arriving around Thanksgiving.

November Hours:
Monday – Saturday, 9-6
Closed Thanksgiving Day

Holiday Open House November 13th & 14th
Our annual holiday open house is not to be missed. This year we are giving shoppers two days to take advantage of special pricing on holiday décor. Come and be inspired by our latest festive displays, décor and abundant ornaments.
Save 20% on holiday décor Friday November 13th and Saturday November 14th.

Retail Therapy Days
November 27th and 28th
25% off everyday gift items

28 Sep 2020

4 Reasons to Plant Bulbs this Fall

1- Bulbs are Beautiful:
Vibrant colors, fragrance and eye appealing combinations make bulbs one of the most charming flowers of the spring.

2- Bulbs are Easy to Plant:
Plant bulbs once and reap the rewards of color year after year. Simply choose a sunny spot with well-drained soil. Dig a hole two to three times the bulb’s height (for example if a bulb is two inches tall, dig a hole four to six inches deep). Sprinkle the bottom of the hole with bulb food or bone meal and place the bulb pointy side up. Cover with soil, water once and wait for spring! To plant bigger clumps of bulbs, follow the same method as above but make a wider hole and place multiple bulbs into the same hole. This ‘pit planting’ method saves time and bigger groups of bulbs make more of a visual impact than a scattering of single bulbs.

3- Bulbs Will Make You Happy:
Imagine a warm spring day after months of seeing mostly snow, ice and mud. You walk outside and ta-da! A pretty clump of purple crocus are blooming right next to the receding snow. Studies have shown that flowers release the ‘happy’ brain chemicals triggering positive emotions. Plant bulbs to plant happiness!

4- Bulbs Feed the Pollinators:
Yes, bulbs are wonderful for spring color, but did you know that flowering bulbs are also a valuable food source for bees? Bulbs are one of the first available pollen sources for bees and other pollinating insects.

Plant bulbs in the Fall:
All spring-blooming bulbs like daffodils, tulips and crocus need a cold period before they will bloom. This starts the biochemical process that makes them bloom. Bulbs are not like seeds where they can be viable for months without planting. Bulbs will dry out and are unlikely to bloom if they are not planted in the fall. Plant bulbs any time before the ground freezes.

02 Sep 2020

September at MD

Due to the increased demand on landscaping products and plant material locally and nationwide, we have experienced shortages on some of our regular garden center products. We appreciate your flexibility when making choices and we will do our best to help you choose alternatives if an item you are seeking is not available.
Our staff continues to be vigilant in routine sanitation of carts, shopping baskets and other common surfaces. We kindly ask all customers entering retail areas to follow CDC guidelines and local mandates for face coverings and social distancing. We appreciate your compliance and will provide customers with masks as needed.

We are grateful for our community and we appreciate your business. Thank you for your patience and flexibility while shopping with us!

Alternate Ways to Shop:
Call ahead: We are taking phone orders for specific items. Pay over the phone and we will set aside your items for curbside pick-up. Call 208-354-8816.
Shop online: We have a selection of gardening essentials and gift cards available for online purchase. Online purchases will be set aside for curbside pick-up.
Visit https://mdnursery.square.site/

Fall Hours begin September 1st:
9-6 Monday- Saturday
Open Monday Labor Day

Fall Planting Sale
-40% off perennials

-40% off fall annuals
-25% off potted shrubs
-40% off potted crabapple trees & potted maple trees
Plus select sale shrubs $12 each or 5 for $50

Goodbye, Marigold Café
We are deeply grateful to our loyal customers and friends for the past 7 years of Marigold goodness. Sadly, this piece of MD Nursery, while well loved, is no longer sustainable. Outstanding Marigold gift cards can be used in the MD gift shop, greenhouse or flower market. Hungry shoppers will be able to find snacks, drinks and simple sandwiches available in the ‘Cooler Café’ within the greenhouse.

18 Aug 2020

What Bugs Us?

Cabbage Worms
Cabbage worms are the larvae of the cabbage butterfly. These pests feed on cabbages and other brassicas like broccoli, cauliflowers, Brussels sprouts, and kale. Their green coloring makes them tough to detect until they have started chewing crops. Ragged tears and holes in leaves are typical signs of their presence.
Like many garden pests, prevention is best. A floating row cover (DeWitt ™ seed guard) set out early in the growing season will keep cabbage butterflies from laying their eggs on plants. If you do spot cabbage worms, control the populations with hand-picking or applying the affected crops with Bt (bacillus thuringiensis) or Spinosad. Both Bt and Spinosad are the active ingredient in commercial organic insecticides. Our friendly greenhouse staff can help you choose the correct product with these ingredients. Remember to always read the directions on the product label and apply product precisely!

11 Aug 2020

6 Perennials for Late Summer Color

Some of our favorite perennial flowers like columbine, peonies and lupine are finished blooming for the season. While these popular perennials are no longer in their prime, gardeners can keep the colors going with these late season bloomers:

Yarrow: We love the colorful choices of this super tough plant. Available in sunset colors, pinks and white, yarrow is also deer and vole resistant and makes a long-lasting cut flower.
Echinacea: Also known as coneflower, Echinacea is typically purple or white, but newer varieties of orange and yellow are beginning to become popular. Echinacea is an excellent cut flower and attracts butterflies.
Ornamental Grasses: August is the time ornamental grasses really start to shine. Their seed heads shimmer in the golden sunlight and the gentle sway of their stems add a magical element to any landscape.
Sedum: There are a wide variety of sedums, most begin to bloom late summer. Bloom colors vary from pink to yellow and white. Use sedums as ground covers, in rock gardens or try them in a container. Taller varieties like ‘autumn joy’ really pack a late season color punch, especially when planted in masses. Pollinating insects love sedums as a late-season pollen source.
Russian Sage: Drifts of soft purple spikes and grey foliage make Russian Sage a late summer standout. It thrives in hot sun and is drought tolerant once established.
Helenium: Featuring daisy-like flowers in warm tones of red, orange, and yellow, helenium can be anywhere from 1-3 feet tall. Its long stems make it a wonderful flower for cutting.

31 Jul 2020

August at MD:

August is a wonderful month to relax, spend time outside and soak up the last full month of summer in the Tetons. If your outdoor living space is lacking furniture, comfort, flair or all of the above, then a stop at our gift shop is in order. Find dining sets, garden benches or some comfy outdoor seating. Elevate your space with an outdoor rug, lanterns, comfy pillows and strings of outdoor lights. August is a good time to see what your landscape may be missing and fill in the blanks with late summer blooming perennials, hardy shrubs or trees to create shade. Plant now for fall color and incorporate fall favorites like maple trees, Swedish aspen, chokeberry, burning bush or ornamental grasses.
Please Note:
Due to the increased demand on landscaping products and plant material locally and nationwide, we have experienced shortages on some of our regular offerings. We appreciate your flexibility when making choices and we will do our best to help you choose alternatives if an item you are seeking is not available.
Our staff continues to be vigilant in routine sanitation of carts, shopping baskets and other common surfaces. Per county mandate, masks are required inside all public places. We appreciate your compliance and will provide customers with masks as needed.

We are grateful for our community and we appreciate your business. Thank you for your patience and flexibility while shopping with us!

Alternate Ways to Shop:
Call ahead: We are taking phone orders for specific items. Pay over the phone and we will set aside your items for curbside pick-up. Call 208-354-8816.
Shop online: We have a selection of gardening essentials and gift cards available for online purchase. Online purchases will be set aside for curbside pick-up.
Visit https://mdnursery.square.site/

08 Jul 2020

Wild Weather Gardening

Perfect summer weather in our region is seldom long-lasting. Seasoned locals can tell the tales of late June freezes, snow on the fourth of July or winds that blew away the trampoline. Savvy gardeners are also studious weather observers, ready to act no matter what Ma Nature throws our way. Here are some of our common wild weather extremes and tips for damage control.

Snow: A light blanket of snow over blooming flowers and emerging leaves will do little damage, but accompanying cold temperatures can be an issue with tender annuals, hanging baskets and veggie gardens (see ‘frost’ in the following paragraph). Heavy snow on fully leafed-out trees and blooming flowers can topple whole trees, break branches and squish flowers. If it’s snowing and accumulating heavily, shaking branches free of snow can help reduce the weight and chance of breakage. After a summer snow storm, cut or prune anything damaged or broken. Healthy trees and plants will eventually re-grow.

Frost: The good news is that frosts are usually forecast. The bad news is that frost can happen any day of the summer. A daily habit of checking the weather forecast will arm you with the information needed to act. If/when frost is predicted, cover tender plants and veggie gardens with frost cloth (we sell DeWitt™ N-Sulate), an old sheet or a tarp. Harvest any ripe produce from your veggie garden and when possible, move tender hanging baskets and potted annuals indoors. Frost damage can be trimmed off with clean, sharp pruners. Perennials, trees and shrubs may be slightly damaged after a cold night, but usually will regrow.

Hail: This is probably the least predictable and most damaging weather event we can experience. If hail is imminent, take down exposed hanging baskets and cover veggie gardens with frost cloth, a tarp or an old sheet. Hail can tear holes in leaves and strip leaves off trees, shrubs and flowers. Extreme wind gusts can break branches. After a hail event, the best course of action is a good clean-up. With clean, sharp tools, trim branches, flower stems or anything broken. Rake up shredded leaves and plant bits. Fertilize everything with a low dose liquid plant food for additional energy.

Heat: Most mature plants can adapt to heat, but new plants with small root systems can struggle. Plants won’t bloom as well or develop fruit in hot weather. Regular watering early morning or evening hours is best. Be sure to water deeply at the root zone, not just wetting the foliage. Hanging baskets and plants in small containers can dry out very quickly. Some planters and baskets may even need to be moved into a protected shady spot for relief from the heat (this is also a good strategy when you’re gone for a few days). If plants get too dry, the tips will turn brown and crispy. In this case, cut off any of the damage, soak the plant thoroughly and fertilize with a mild liquid plant food.

Wind: Extreme winds associated with storms can break or damage tree limbs or other plants. Once the wind event is over, use clean sharp tools to trim anything broken or damaged. Continuous high winds can dry out hanging baskets or new plants in a snap. If possible, move plants to a sheltered spot such as a covered porch. If it’s not possible to move plants, be sure to water deeply at the root zone. During hot and windy weather, plants may wilt even though the roots are moist simply because they are transpiring (losing moisture from foliage) faster than they are able to take up water from their roots. Plants will usually rebound once the wind dies down and the day cools. If plants get too dry, the tips will turn brown and crispy. In this case, cut off any of the damage, soak the plant thoroughly and fertilize with a liquid plant food.

Fortunately, plants are very adaptable to many weather extremes and will put on new growth after being damaged. Routine maintenance will encourage healthy plants that are able to recover from weather extremes.

Links to regional weather forecasts:
National Weather Service:
Mountain Weather:
Teton Valley Weather: