The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
11 Oct 2017

19th Annual Fall Fest

In its 19th year, the Fall Festival at MD is happening Saturday October 21st from 12-3. Join us in our greenhouse for an afternoon free family fun including games, activities, face painting and hayrides. Donations will be collected at the pumpkin painting tables to support the Teton Valley Education Foundation, so bring some cash. A mini farmer’s market and a pumpkin pie bake off round off the event. Pie contestants can bring their finest pumpkin pie to our expert judges upstairs at Marigold Café. The Bake off winner earns a $50 MD gift card.
Wear a costume for fun!

04 Oct 2017

It’s October, Now What?

Leaves are dropping, the air is crisp, growing season is over and this is the month to prepare your landscape for winter and the next growing season. Taking the time to for some final chores really pays off.
October is Time to:

1) Plant bulbs: Wake up your garden next spring with colorful daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and tulips. Plant bulbs any time in October and enjoy pops of color for years to come.

2) Water: A cold dry fall can be deadly for many ornamental plants. Well-hydrated roots increase a plant’s chance of survival before our seasonal blanket of snow covers the ground. Water trees, shrubs and flower beds every week or two (depending on the weather) until the snow stays on the ground. Fall watering is especially important for evergreens as they continually loose moisture through their needles.

3) Spray evergreens with Wilt Pruf™: Wilt Pruf™ is an anti-desiccant that gets sprayed on evergreens late fall to protect from winter burn. Winter burn happens to newly planted evergreens that don’t have deep roots to draw moisture from. Evergreens continually transpire (give off water vapor) through their needles, even in winter. If a tree is unable to replenish the water in its needles, winter burn damage will result. Wilt Pruf™ coats needles with a clear film that slows transpiration resulting in less winter burn.

4) Spread wildflower and grass seed: Fall is the best time for seeding. Many wildflowers require a period of freezing temperatures to germinate. Wildflower and grass seed will lay dormant until spring.

5) Replenish veggie beds: Fall is a great time to ‘feed’ the soil in your veggie garden. After harvesting and cleaning up plant debris, spread a 2-4 inch layer of compost (we like Happy Frog or Black Gold) over top and work it into the top 6 inches or so with a spade or digging fork. Rake smooth and your beds will be ready to rock next season!
Note: Do this when the soil is dry to avoid a clumpy, muddy mess and to keep the soil from becoming compact.

6) Protect from critters: Protect trees and shrubs from browsing deer and moose by spraying with Plantskydd™ repellent and fencing with DeerBlock™. Plastic trunk protectors will keep chewing animals like voles from damaging the trunks of your trees. Broadcast a granular repellent like Repellex™ or Molemax™ over your lawn to reduce the tunneling of voles. Although these measures don’t guarantee a damage-free landscape, they can reduce the extent of winter damage.

7) Fertilize your lawn: A late application of fall lawn fertilizer will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and faster new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health.

Need some help? From spraying to fencing, our maintenance department can do it for you!
Click here to get a quote https://mdlandscapinginc.com/get-a-quote/

20 Sep 2017

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Throughout our region we are fortunate enough to encounter all kinds of wildlife. They inhabited this area first and we over took their migration paths and feeding grounds. As majestic as they are, moose, elk, deer and even buffalo can wreak havoc on newly planted and established landscapes. Big game animals tend to be in our neighborhoods in the fall, winter and spring. As the snow melts, they return to higher elevations for the summer months.
There are a few strategies to deter wildlife from our landscapes. Use these strategies alone or in combination to protect your valuable landscape from big game damage.

Use Wildlife-Resistant Plants:
No plant is ‘wildlife-proof’. If animals are starving, they will eat anything available. However, some plants tend to be less palatable to wildlife. If your home is in an area frequented by wildlife, avoid disappointment by choosing these plants:
• Spruce
• Buffaloberry
• Cotoneaster
• Juniper
• Lilac
• Potentilla
• Serviceberry
• Spirea
• Viburnum
• Hawthorne

Apples, crabapples, birch, willow, roses and dogwood are best avoided as these are preferred by wildlife.
For a complete list, click here: http://dev.mdlandscapinginc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/GardeningAroundDeer.pdf

Repellents:
Commercially made repellants such as Plantskydd™ are effective when applied as directed. Apply repellants at intervals throughout season for best results.

Scare Tactics:
Wildlife don’t like unfamiliar sounds, lights or movement. Lights on motion sensors or a well-trained barking dog can be helpful.

Predator Urine:
This is a natural way of keeping wildlife out of your yard. A few drops in placed in strategic areas around your property can keep game out for 1-3 weeks. Animals eventually get used to the scent and other tactics need to be used at this point. Available from predatorpee.com.

Wildlife Fencing:
A physical barrier has proved time and time again to be the most reliable way to keep big game away from your plants. Fence off individual trees, groups of trees or entire properties.

Dealing with wildlife can be tricky.  On one hand you want to protect the investment of your landscape while being as respectful to nature as possible. Being flexible and ready to use multiple strategies is often the best approach to dealing with wildlife on your property.

09 Sep 2017

Spring Flowering Bulbs: Plant Now for Spring Color

Spring flowering bulbs are one of the easiest ways to add color around your home in early spring. Tulips, crocus and daffodils need to be planted this fall to bloom next spring. Instead of dull brown, white and grey surrounding you next April, imagine brilliant pops of yellow, purple, red or orange after a long Teton winter.  Pollinating insects also love flowering bulbs in your garden. As one of the first food sources available early spring, pollinators rely on these flowers early season. A little investment in bulbs this fall will be well appreciated next spring.

Planting is easy and can be done anytime between mid-September through October, or even later if the ground is not yet frozen. Select a location with good drainage. If you’re not sure if the drainage is good or not, dig a test hole and fill it with water. The water should drain through in a few minutes. If not, find a different site. Bulbs will rot if situated in spots with poor drainage. Dig a hole twice as deep as the height of the bulb. For example, a 2 inch daffodil bulb needs a hole that is 4 inches deep.  Sprinkle bulb food or bone meal at the bottom of the hole. For larger masses of bulbs, dig one bigger pit at the correct depth.  Place the bulbs in, pointy side up and top with soil. Water thoroughly and enjoy a happy display of color next spring!

Bulbs and Critters:

Worried that everything you plant will be eaten? Fear not, follow these tips:

  • Select less palatable varieties such as daffodils, snow drops, crocus and alliums.
  • Plant with a repellant such as Plantskyd ™, Repellex™ or blood meal.
  • In extreme cases, bulbs can be planted within a wire mesh cage.So tough! Crocus come up each spring and are not phased by additional snow or cold.

 

 

 

01 Sep 2017

5 Reasons to Plant Trees this Fall

 

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:

1)      Less Stress:

Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

2)      Warm Ground Temperatures:

Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.

3)      Ready to Grow:

Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

4)      Fall Specials:

Fall is a great time to shop. All container trees and shrubs are 20% off.

5)      One Less Spring Project:

Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen.  For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October.

25 Aug 2017

Fall Planter Makeover

Dead, crunchy leaves, pale spindly foliage, aphids…

Does this describe your once-beautiful planter? With a few fresh plants and an energizing dose of plant food, you can have a pretty, welcoming planter with flowers to last another month or two. Here’s how:

1)      Pull out any dead plants and replace with fresh fall annuals such as pansies, kale or mums or ornamental peppers.

2)      Trim overgrown foliage plants.

3)      Water with a liquid plant food such as Fox Farms™ Tiger Bloom.

 

14 Aug 2017

What Bugs Us? Spider Mites

Spider mites are common garden pests that feed on shrubs, trees, flowers, vegetables and even houseplants. These miniscule pests cause damage by bruising the plant’s tissues as they feed leading to mottled, brown foliage. Spider mites are difficult to see to the naked eye, but their presence can be detected by webbing on a plant and brown, mottled or dirty-looking foliage. To confirm the presence of spider mites, try holding a sheet of plain white paper below suspect plants.  Tap or flick the foliage above the paper. Using a magnifying glass or the naked eye, watch for any tiny specs that move. These are mites.  Outbreaks occur under hot, dry conditions and can seriously injure or kill a plant.  There are a few ways to control spider mites:

  • Hosing: A strong jet of water can destroy webbing and knock down spider mites populations.
  • Beneficial Insects: Ladybugs, sold commercially, can be released underneath mite-infested plants to feed on mites.
  • Neem Oil and Pyrethrins:  These are typically combined in a multipurpose spray such as Safer™ brand 3 in 1 Garden Spray. Always follow the directions on the label.
  • Horticultural Oil: This is possibly the best control available for the home gardener. The oil suffocates the eggs and the adults. Always follow the directions on the label.
  • Avoiding strong insecticides containing imidacloprid that kill mite’s natural enemies will help avoid mite infestations by keeping the beneficial insect population higher.

Maintaining healthy plants will also help avoid mite infestations. Plants stressed by drought, crowding or lack of nutrients are prone to insect problems.

04 Aug 2017

5th Annual Big Zucchini Contest

It’s almost time for our annual Big Zucchini Contest.  Bring in your homegrown zucchini for judging between 9:00 am and noon on Saturday, August 12th. Zucchini must be grown in Teton County Idaho or Wyoming. Contest is free to enter and fun for all ages.  One entry per household.

The winner gets bragging rights and a $50 MD gift card!

28 Jul 2017

The Best Trees and Shrubs for Screening

Screening is an important part of landscaping. We all love our mountain views, but the view your neighbor’s RV? Not so much. Screening eases the eyesores and adds beauty, privacy and interest to your property.

Before planting anything, be aware of how tall and wide a particular plant will grow. Proper placement and spacing will allow for healthy growth and spare the headache of crowded plants down the road.  Take the time to visualize what you would like to screen. Look at the site from different vantages: from inside your home, from your deck or from your driveway.   You may want a straight hedge or a combination of a few plants in differing heights.

These hardy trees and shrubs will help block out the unsightly views:

 

  • Colorado Spruce: These big, beautiful conifers are our best seller season after season. Dense branching covered with bluish-green needles offer year round screening. Mature height is 60 feet mature width is 20 feet.
  • Peking or Hedge Cotoneaster: This durable deciduous shrub has dense branching, helpful for screening even after the leaves have dropped. Rounded shape up to 6 feet tall and wide with glossy deep green foliage. Cotoneaster is a great choice for a hedge and takes well to trimming. Red fall color.
  • Siberian Peashrub: A great choice for a tall, drought tolerant shrub. Dense branching helps screen in winter. Pretty yellow flowers bloom late spring. Grows up to 15 feet tall and 10 feet wide.
  • Mugho Pine: This is the best low growing evergreen in our region. Ball-shaped shrub with long needles up to 6 feet tall and wide.
  • Canada Red Chokecherry: In its shrub form, this regional staple will grow up to 15 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Though the branching is not as dense for screening in winter, the deep purple foliage makes a nice contrast combined with other plants and will screen well until fall.
  • Alpine Currant: This is one of best choices for a lower growing screen. Dark green foliage and dense branching grow up to 5 feet tall and wide.
  • Dogwood: These hardy shrubs grow up to 8 feet tall and wide. These natives have the added bonus of vibrant red stems for lovely winter contrast.
  • Swedish Aspen: These gorgeous aspen grow up to 40 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Their narrow profile make these ideal for closer spacing to offer a tall screening effect. Vibrant orange-red fall color make these a standout.
21 Jul 2017

Deep Root Tree Fertilization: What is it?

 

Just like lawns and flowers, trees thrive when fertilized. Fertilizing helps maintain healthy growth, important for disease and pest resistance plus resilience in a challenging environment.

Deep-root fertilizing is the process of using an injector (a pogo stick-like device) to deliver liquid fertilizer directly underground into the root zone.  This allows the tree to uptake nutrients quickly for an immediate boost. Skilled tree care technicians follow a recipe in preparing fertilizer for deep root application. In addition to balanced tree fertilizer, mycorrhizae (beneficial fungi) are injected for optimal root growth.  Deep-root fertilizing is done either in the spring, fall or both if a tree is showing signs of poor health.

Noticeable improvements in tree growth and overall health are expected after just a few years of treatment.   Whether you have deciduous or evergreen trees, this service will help protect your landscape investment.  Contact us for pricing or to schedule a consultation. info@mdalndscapinginc.com