The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
15 Jun 2018

Gardening with Kids

It’s nothing new, but we all know that children today are more prone than ever to stress, obesity and ADHD. Research has shown that kids with access to greenspace such as gardens on a daily basis have reaped many health benefits including increased attention span and deeper forms of creative play. Children who grow their own vegetables are more likely to eat them. How are parents to encourage kids to get outside and garden? Here are a few tips:

• Give a child their very own planting space to plant and dig as they please.
• Plant veggies kids like to eat such as carrots, sugar snap peas, strawberries and potatoes.
• Try planting crazy veggies like purple potatoes, atomic red carrots or dragon’s tongue beans.
• Create a theme garden. Popular themes include a pizza patch (see below), hummingbird habitat or a fairy garden.
• Invest in some basic pint- sized tools. Gloves, shovels and buckets are a good start.
• Incorporate some family- friendly features into your existing garden. Birdbaths, houses and feeders, gathering areas such as a dining set or bench, play areas such as a sandbox, fort or swing set.
• Involve your kids in harvesting. Kids love to pick peas, dig up potatoes, pull carrots and cut lettuce.
• Pass the scissors. Older children can cut some salad greens or some flowers to bring into the house.
• Hand them the hose! Very small kids are delighted to fill up a watering can and water something. Bigger kids can use the hose to fill birdbaths and water the veggie patch.
• Lead by example. Your kids are more likely to garden if you’re out there too!
• Make it fun. Great ideas can be found on our pinterest board, children’s gardening

RECIPE FOR A PIZZA GARDEN
Imagine a six foot wide pizza, cut into jumbo slices, outlined with a thick rock crust overflowing with your favorite toppings. The idea of a pizza garden begins with making the ‘pizza’. Either create a round bed with rocks and divide into slices or use another round vessel such as a kiddie pool (with drainage holes in the bottom!). Fill your ‘pizza’ with good quality planting soil and divide into slices. Use rocks or string to delineate the slices. Let the kids decide what kind of toppings they’d like to grow and add any or all of these ingredients. Plant your slices and water regularly. Plan a pizza party for the end of summer as the grand finale!

• tomato plants
• bell pepper plants
• zucchini plants
• rosemary plant
• oregano plants
• onion plants
• Orange marigold or calendula plants (as the ‘cheese’)
• Spinach seeds
• Arugula seeds
• Broccoli plants

14 Jun 2018

Penne with Spinach

Spinach is one of the easiest greens to grow, often providing local gardeners with a bountiful harvest through June. Spinach loves cool weather and will begin to bolt, or flower once the temperatures climb. It’s best to pick spinach before bolting for the best flavor. Here’s is a simple, healthy and tasty way to include the harvest in your dinner!

Ingredients:
1 pound penne
3 garlic cloves
2 ounces goat cheese
1 ounce cream cheese
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
6 ounces fresh spinach leaves
2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan
Directions:
Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add the penne and cook until it is tender but still firm to the bite, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes.

Mince the garlic in a food processor. Add the goat cheese, cream cheese, 3/4 teaspoon of salt, 1/2 teaspoon of pepper, and half of the spinach leaves. Blend until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Set the cheese and spinach mixture aside.

Meanwhile, place the remaining spinach leaves in a large bowl.

Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Spoon the pasta atop the spinach leaves in the bowl. Scrape the cheese and spinach mixture over the pasta mixture and toss to coat, adding enough reserved cooking liquid to moisten. Season the pasta to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with Parmesan and serve.

Recipe adapted from foodnetwork.com

06 Jun 2018

Flower Bed Maintenance

You’ve just purchased hundreds of dollars’ worth of plants, sweated and toiled to plant everything and now you get to sit back and relax and enjoy the fruits of your labor, right? Well yes, but to get the most out of your plants, some maintenance is key.
There is more to bed maintenance than just weeding:
Pre-Emergent:
Pre-Emergent herbicides prevent seeds from germinating. Applied early summer, pre-emergents can save you a lot of time weeding. Organic and synthetic pre-emergents are available. It’s important to note that they don’t kill existing weeds.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Fertilizer:
Fertilizing your plants will boost the health and appearance of your plants. Granular fertilizers can be applied once or twice a season. Liquid fertilizers can be applied throughout the growing season and are quickly absorbed to provide and immediate boost to your plants. We carry a wide variety of natural and synthetic fertilizers.
Always read the label and apply the product as directed!
Mulch:
Mulch helps retain soil moisture, keeps weeds from germinating and helps regulate soil temperature. Most mulches we stock are forestry by-products like shredded and chipped bark. Rock or gravel can also be used as mulch, depending on the look you are trying to achieve.
Landscape Fabric:
Landscape Fabric is not a guarantee to keep weeds under control, but will help. Fabric must be completely covered with mulch for best results. Fabric around flowers, small plantings, and in small spaces can be more trouble than it’s worth. In this case, it’s better to use a thick layer of mulch without fabric. Come stop by our Nursery to see which type of landscape fabric would work best for you.
Pruning & Shaping:
Pruning and shaping trees and shrubs within your beds can be a great way to promote health in your plants. This practice also defines spaces between plants making your beds more attractive. As a general rule, prune anything dead, diseased or broken at any time. For blooming plants such as lilacs, prune after they bloom. Taking no more than one third off any plant at one time is the best practice. Always use clean, sharp tools and disinfect blades with a bleach solution or Lysol between cuts to prevent the spread of disease.

18 May 2018

Vegetable Gardening Basics Part 2

Now that your garden is growing, it’s time to maintain it for the best results!
WEED CONTROL

• Allow a bit of time daily to do a walk by your garden. This will help you notice any changes or problems that may arise.
• Mulching will help control weeds- use compost, dried grass, straw, or plastic.
• Hand pull weeds weekly before anything gets out of hand.
• A hoe or cultivator will help knock weeds down while they’re still small.
• For anything really tenacious use a chemical but try to keep it organic.

IRRIGATION

• Soaker hoses or drip lines on timers are the easiest.
• Getting out into the garden and hand watering every day is the best way to become aware of any weed or pest activity.

PESTS

Each season, an array of pests attack veggie gardens. Here are some of the common ones and treatment method. The products listed here are natural or organic controls.

• Flea beetles- These tiny insects are common on radish, arugula, lettuce and beans. If you’ve had trouble in the past, cover these crops soon after planting with row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard). Safer™ End All can be applied if they become a problem.
• Cabbage moths- Row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard) will keep these little white moths from laying eggs on cruciferous crops. A routine treatment of Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust) also helps.
• Cabbage Worms- Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust)
• Potato beetles- Spray with Safer™ End All or hand picking.
• Aphids- Knock them down with Safer™ Insecticidal Soap or a strong jet of water.

FERTILIZERS

As was mentioned in part 1, nutrient-rich soil is vital to productive veggie gardens. Adding compost or manure or some combination yearly will give you the best results.

Since veggies are heavy feeders, a routine application of fertilizer throughout the growing season is important for healthy plants and a bountiful harvest. We stock wide array of organic and conventional fertilizers available to the home gardener. A granular fertilizer can be added at planting time and will slowly feed throughout the season. Liquid fertilizers are fast acting and will need to be reapplied. By law, companies are required to list the N-P-K composition on their product. These will be listed as numbers such as 10-15-6.

• N-Nitrogen-Important for greening up.
• P-Phosphate-Important for rooting, blooming and fruiting.
• K-Potassium-Important for overall vigor.
• Micronutrients are also important for plant and soil health.

Always read the label before applying any kind of pesticide or fertilizer and follow the instructions precisely.

HARVESTING
It’s best to harvest veggies in the morning or during cool weather, so they will stay crisp and last longer.
Greens: Leaf lettuces, salad mixes, arugula and spinach varieties can be cut with scissors as soon as they’re 2 or more inches tall. Cut young kale, chard and beet greens to add to salads. Harvest these until they ‘bolt’ or flower. Once they have bolted, they will be bitter.
Beans and Peas: Pick these often and the plants will produce for longer.
Summer Squash: Cut off the vine while they’re still small for best flavor.
Tomatoes: pick as they ripen, but they will continue to ripen at room temperature off the vine. Pay attention to late summer and early fall temperatures and pick your tomatoes before they freeze.
Kale and Swiss chard: Can be harvested early summer for salads or late summer/ early fall for larger leaves.
Carrots, Beets and Potatoes: Most varieties are best harvested in the fall during cool, dry weather.
Cabbage: Harvest after a few frosts for best flavor.

You’ll find it hard to buy veggies from the store that match the flavor of home grown. With some patience, care and knowledge, you’ll be able to enjoy your bounty for years to come!

09 May 2018

Hardscapes

More and more people are eager to expand their living space outside. A patio makes a great space to gather, dine, relax and enjoy the precious summer months. There are many options for hardscape patios to choose from depending on your budget: gravel surfaces, concrete, pavers and flagstone. Even within those categories there are many choices for color and texture. Water features, fire pits, outdoor kitchens, seating areas, boulder seats and wood structures such as pergolas can be added to customize a patio.
Our landscaping department has designed and installed hundreds of outdoor patio spaces for satisfied clients throughout the years. We have the area’s largest selection of pavers, stone, boulders and patio products. The grounds at MD has an array of installed pavers and flagstone samples. Homeowners are welcome to come and look at all we have to offer. It’s helpful to view products in person before making a decision.
Once the finished product is in place, selecting patio furniture and accents will really make the space feel like part of your home. This season we are excited carry the Ebel™ outdoor furniture line along with an, Durawood™ Adirondak chairs and an assortment of rockers, benches and bistro sets. Solar lanterns, garden art, pots of flowers and decorative cushions all add a personal finishing touch to a patio. A nice cold beverage of choice and some good company are all you need to complete your summer patio experience! Come in today or contact us for a quote https://mdlandscapinginc.com/get-a-quote/ and see what we have to offer.

25 Apr 2018

Spring Fest Saturday, May 5th

Join us for the annual Spring Fest to celebrate the gardening season.
We’ll have $10 deals all day like selected $10 shrubs, trees, gift shop specials and more. Pottery and outdoor furniture will be 20% off for the day.

For the younger set, we’ll have a gardening project, face painting and a chance to visit with Teton Valley’s cutest baby farm animals. Face painting and animals are available from 11-2.

Great prizes will be raffled off throughout the event and we’ll have free gifts for our first 50 paying customers. This is one event you will not want to miss!

18 Apr 2018

Vegetable Gardening Basics Part 1

Vegetable gardening is a growing trend for so many reasons: health, economy, variety and taste are just some of benefits to growing vegetables at home. A bit of planning up front really pays off in the productivity of your garden. Here is part one of a two part series intended to guide those beginner gardeners or serve as a resource for those who have experience.
SELECT YOUR SITE
• Choose a site with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight and good drainage with no low, wet areas.
• If possible, choose a site sheltered from wind and near a south facing wall for radiant heat.
• Try to stay away from trees and shrubs that send up shoots such as aspens, cottonwoods or chokecherries.
• Keep your garden small at first and expand as you learn what works for you.
SOIL PREP
• The soil should be dry before being worked to avoid compaction.
• Add lots of organic material (compost, aged manure, shredded leaves) to improve soil condition, fertility, drainage, nutrient and water holding ability.
• If you are planting any heavy feeders such as squash, cucumbers or melons, add a granular fertilizer made for veggies such as Alaska™ Tomato & Veg fertilizer
• Soil can be warmed up faster by putting a layer of clear plastic over it for a few days before planting.

GARDEN LAYOUT
• If possible, consider building raised beds for gardening. There will be better drainage, the beds warm up earlier and there is less bending or kneeling.
• Don’t plant tall plants or build trellises where they will shade other plants.
• Crop rotation is important for healthy crops. Try not to plant the same vegetable in the same place year after year.
• Keep any paths or walkways wide enough for a wheelbarrow.

PLANTING SEEDS
• Seeds need four things for germination:
-dirt
-water
-light
-the right soil temperature
• Follow the instructions on the seed packet.
• Choose seeds that have a short days to germination time and a short days to harvest time, all this information will be on the seed packet
• Spinach, peas, potatoes, radish, and greens like kale, Swiss chard and arugula can be planted late April through May.
• Wait until June to plant warm season veggies like beans and squash.
• Many vegetables are available as seedlings or starts. Long-season veggies like tomatoes, cabbages, broccoli and peppers are best to plant from starts.

09 Apr 2018

Dogscaping: planning a dog-friendly landscape

We mountain people love our dogs and outdoor spaces. Dogscaping is intended as a way to be mindful of our dog’s needs while keeping our landscaped outdoor areas comfortable and beautiful for humans too. If you are planning your landscape from scratch, lucky you! Here is your chance to incorporate some dog-friendly ideas from the outset. If you already an established landscape, these tips can help keep that landscape beautiful and comfortable for your pets and you.

Dog-Friendly Zones:
Comfort Zones: Planting trees and shrubs for shade throughout your landscape will provide a cool spot to rest throughout the day. A patch of lawn or the cushion of durable ground cover plants make comfy places to relax. Bare dirt, stone walkways or a sunny deck provide opportunities to keep warm and soak up the sun.

Water Zone: At a minimum, provide a fresh supply of water for your dog outdoors. Water-loving breeds adore kiddie pools or natural water features for drinking and cooling off in hot weather. If you really want to spoil your dog, splurge on a commercially made pet fountain to provide cool fresh water at any time.

Potty Zone: Dogs will typically choose a spot to relieve themselves routinely. If you are introducing a new dog to your landscape or if you are planning a landscape from scratch, pick an area for your dog to go potty. It could be as simple as a weedy patch or as elaborate as a special gravel area with some upright ‘marking’ rocks. With some training and encouragement, dogs will return to their potty spot. Be sure to make this spot accessible in the wintertime too. An extra potty path through deeper snow will help your dog stay on track.

Pet Friendly Yard Care Products:
Choosing less toxic methods for pest or weed control is the best practice. There are plenty of effective, natural products on the market. Even if they are labeled natural or organic, it’s still important to keep your pets out of the product and only use products as directed on the label. Some dogs find organic fertilizers like bone meal or blood meal very attractive will eat or lick it off your plants. Be watchful and consider using liquid fertilizers that are absorbed more quickly.

Lawns and Groundcovers:
When cared for properly, turf grasses can withstand the traffic of playful dogs. Dogs love the cool and comfort of a lawn as much as humans do. What lawns do not love is the high concentration of nitrogen in dog urine. If your dog is continues to urinate repeatedly in the same spot, consider removing the turf altogether and replacing it with a gravel potty spot.
To correct urine kill spots, rake out the dead grass, fluff up the soil a bit, sprinkle with lime and reseed. Continue to water the patch consistently until the grass germinates. Commercially made dog spot treatment products are also an easy and effective way to fix dead spots.
Once established, many perennials can withstand the occasional run-though. Avoid planting anything with feathery, ferny foliage as these can quickly get trampled. Use fencing to keep dogs out of newly planted areas, highly valued flower beds or veggie gardens. Use traffic resistant ground covers like wooley thyme, creeping thyme, Irish moss, creeping jenny, snow in summer and lamb’s ears.

Keep them safe:
Toxic Plants: Most dogs will avoid toxic plants because they are usually unpalatable. It’s wise for their humans to be aware of which plants can cause trouble:
– Rhubarb
– Foxglove
– Iris
– Begonia
– Dahlia
– Monkshood
– Daffodils
– Tulips

Compost: If you compost at home, be sure to enclose it securely to protect your dog from eating it. The bacteria from decomposing food waste can cause an upset stomach or diarrhea.

Fun Ideas:
Ready to take dogscaping to the next level? Try one or more of these ideas:
Doggie pool or fountain: Installing a water feature with Fido in mind will keep him or her cool on hot days. If that’s not in your budget, a simple sprinkler set on low can be entertaining for some breeds.
Sensory log: Drill holes in an old log and fill with various essential oils or treats.
Designated dig spot: A sand box with buried toys or treats is a great way to occupy dogs who love digging.
Doggie ice lick: Simply fill a bigger yogurt or ice cream container with water and mix in some treats or toys. Perfect for hot days.

15 Mar 2018

Teton Valley Winter Farmer’s Market Ends March 17th

…and we couldn’t have done it without you!
We are so grateful for our fantastic vendors and the support of our community for making this a great season. If you haven’t experienced the market yet, don’t miss your last chance to do so. Get out of the house and enjoy live music from noon-2, raffle prizes and of course, local offerings of cheese, bread, grass-fed beef, ceramics, gluten-free goodies, preserves and so much more!

12 Mar 2018

Starting Seed Indoors

Starting Seeds Indoors

Are you trying to get a jump on the growing season? Are there specific varieties of veggies or flowers you like? If you’re saying ‘yes’, then starting seeds at home is for you. There is a great deal of pleasure seeing seeds sprout and even more to witness those tiny seeds bear a flower or fruit. Seed starting is a fun indoor activity for kids and adults alike.
March is a good time to start long- season vegetables and flowers indoors. Tomatoes, onions, winter squash, peppers, cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbages) and many flowers can be started this month. The goal of starting your own seed is to have your seedlings ready to plant by the time it’s warm enough outside. The exact timing of indoor seeding will depend on what you are growing and if you are able to transplant seedlings into a protected space like a greenhouse or cold frame. Check the seed packet for sowing information and days to maturity. This will help you determine when to plant.
If you are not the seed-starting type, a variety of seedlings will be available in our greenhouse beginning in April.
For more details on starting vegetable seeds, visit this link: https://mdlandscapinginc.com/2017/03/19/seed-starting-101/We have everything you need to start a seed. Come by and see our large selection of garden seeds, seedling mix, seed starting kits, grow lights and more!