The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
22 Jan 2020

Winter Care for Houseplants

Keeping houseplants healthy through the winter months can be a little tricky. Shorter day length, lower humidity and temperature fluctuations can add up to tough growing conditions. Follow these simple tips to keep your houseplants in top form all winter:
• Keep your room as bright as possible. Raise blinds and open the curtains during the day
as often as possible. For sun-loving plants such as succulents, consider moving them to a brighter spot or supplement with a grow light to maximize the light they receive.
• Keep room temperature between 60 and 70. Keep plants away from cold windows or drafty doors. Conversely, keep them away from wood stoves and hot air vents. Night time temperatures on the cooler side are best.
• Dry winter air can stress plants. To increase the humidity, group plants together to create a mini pocket of humid space. Mist frequently or if you have a lot of plants, use a room humidifier. Another trick is to place a layer of pebbles in the saucer underneath the plants and pour water over the pebbles. The evaporation will raise the humidity around your plant. Be careful not to let your plant sit in the water, but over top of the pebbles.
• Water and fertilize less. Plants enjoy a time of rest in the winter months, so fertilizing is not necessary. The potting soil should be completely dry before watering. Use tepid water, and water slowly until it seeps out of the drainage holes in the pot.
• Give them a shower. With plants that can be easily moved, bring them to a sink and hose them off with tepid water. This gets rid of dust and small insects such as spider mites and aphids.
When your houseplants are in good shape, you’ll also improve the air quality in your home for houseplants and for yourself.

02 Dec 2019

Christmas Tree Care 101

The beloved Christmas tree is the mark of the season in many of our homes. To help your tree stay fresh, follow these steps:
Fresh Cut Trees:

• Cut a quarter to a half-inch off the bottom of the trunk before placing it in its stand. This is vital to a tree’s ability to uptake water. We’ll do this for you when you purchase your tree here.
• Choose a tree stand with at least a quart holding capacity for water. Fill with water and check daily, trees can drink up to a gallon a day! Continue to add water as needed while your tree is indoors.
• Keep your tree away from any heat sources like fireplaces, appliances or heating vents.

Live Potted Christmas Trees:
Live Christmas trees need extra consideration for holiday decorating and care.
It is important to keep live trees in their dormant state for successful survival beyond the holidays. Gradually acclimate your live tree to room temperature by keeping it in a cool garage for a few days before bringing it indoors. Water your tree and allow it to drain before moving it indoors. Keep your tree indoors for no more than one week or it will break dormancy. Avoid placing your live tree by any heat source and use LED or mini lights that give off little heat. Before returning a live Christmas tree outside, water it thoroughly and move it somewhere cool like a garage before exposing it to winter temperatures. Keep your live tree for the remainder of the winter outdoors where it will have good snow coverage and some shade. This will offer it protection from the elements. Avoid placing your potted tree in a sunny spot or wind exposed area as this will dry out the needles. Once the ground is thawed in the spring, your live Christmas tree can be planted and enjoyed for years to come.
Live trees are not guaranteed.

18 Nov 2019

Our Favorite Hostess Gifts

The holidays are around the corner and like it or not, it’s party season! A small gift is a nice way to show appreciation to your host. While a bottle of wine or a six-pack of beer may do just fine, we’ve come up with some thoughtful ideas from our gift shop to set you apart:

-Dishtowels: Funny, holiday-themed or just plain cute, we have loads of choices to suit your host.
-Soaps & Lotions: Chose from luscious botanical or holiday scents as a lovely gift for the home.
-Idaho Woods playing cards: We love these cute cards because they’re perfect for traveling, and make a great activity for many ages.
-Fresh flowers: Flowers are perfect for those hosts you don’t know well or for someone who ‘has it all’. We have pre-made mixed bouquets or you can call our Flower Market ahead of time to have something arranged for you 208-354-8816 ext. 4020.
– Live plants: Trendy air plants and succulents are different and are easy to care for. Seasonal live holiday plants such as mini pines, poinsettias and Christmas cactus will be arriving around Thanksgiving.
-Candles: Scented or not, the warming glow of a beautiful candle will be appreciated.
-Cocktail napkins: We have a fantastic variety of sassy or serious ones for the host.

12 Nov 2019

November Checklist

Even though our recent temperatures make it feel more like January, there still may be time to complete one or more of these late-season tasks:

• Plant Indoor Bulbs: The outside temperatures won’t foil this plan! November is an excellent time to start paperwhites and amaryllis indoors for holiday gift-giving or for your own enjoyment. Paperwhites take 4-6 weeks to bloom and amaryllis can take 6-12 weeks.
• Spread Wildflower and Grass Seed: Seed will lay dormant until next spring.
All remaining seed is now 50% off.
• Mow, fertilize and protect your lawn: A shorter final cut will reduce the amount of raking next spring. Spread fall fertilizer (we love Espoma ™ organic) and a granular rodent repellant like Molemax™ if voles are a problem in your area.
• Hang and fill bird feeders: We carry a variety of bird feeders and seed to attract a range of wild birds. Feeders placed near trees and shrubs will encourage more visiting birds since they like the protection of nearby branches.

30 Oct 2019

November at MD

November is a busy month in our gift shop and greenhouse as we clear out the last of our summer items and move into holiday mode. There will be lots of changes as we bring in our seasonal decorations to prepare for our annual holiday open house and beyond. Our gift shop is filling up with toys, baby gifts, lotions, soaps, candles, jewelry, seasonal kitchen linens and tableware, mugs, cozy scarves, artwork, doormats and so much more. November is a good time to stop in, see what’s new and maybe even get a head start on the holiday shopping season.

Join us for our annual Holiday Open House Saturday, November 9th. Our annual holiday open house is not to be missed. Come and be inspired by our latest festive displays, décor and abundant ornaments. Save 25% on holiday décor for one day only. Spin the wheel to win prizes and special discounts throughout the day. The first 25 customers of the day receive a free gift (with purchase).

Fresh cut and live potted Christmas trees, poinsettias, wreaths, garland and seasonal greenery will be arriving around Thanksgiving.

07 Oct 2019

Fall Fest Saturday, October 19th

Our MD tradition of free family fun continues from noon until 3, October 19th. Hayrides, games, face painting, kid’s gardening activity, and a mini farmer’s market are all part of the fun. Wear a costume for fun or come as you are. The Education Foundation of Teton Valley will be here to collect donations at the kid’s garden activity table. Bring some extra cash to support this valuable community non-profit. Tag us in your photos with #fallfestatmd to win great prizes!

30 Sep 2019

October Checklist:

It’s a great month to tackle fall yard projects. Some effort this fall will set up your landscape for success and beauty next season and will shorten the to-do list next spring.

Cut back perennial flowers: Once the foliage is brown, perennials can be cut to the ground. Consider leaving some sturdy perennials standing in place for late fall and winter interest. Sedums, coneflower, Russian sage and ornamental grasses can be left standing and look beautiful with a dusting of snow or frost. Cutting back other perennials flowers will save you the task next spring.

Plant spring-flowering bulbs: Wake up your garden next spring with colorful daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and tulips. Spring-blooming bulbs add the color you’ll be craving after winter and provide an early season food source for pollinating insects. Plant bulbs any time in October and enjoy pops of color for years to come.

Plant garlic: Hardy and full-flavored, homegrown garlic is one of the easiest crops to grow. Begin by preparing the soil. It should be about 12 inches deep and amended with compost. Choose garlic varieties meant for planting, not the grocery-store kind. We have a great selection of cold-hardy, gourmet garlic. Separate garlic into cloves. Plant each clove pointy side up about 4 inches deep and 4 to 6 inches apart. One head of garlic will typically yield 8-10 heads next year. Water thoroughly. The garlic will sprout next spring and be ready to harvest late summer.
Water: A cold dry fall can be deadly for many ornamental plants. Well-hydrated roots increase a plants’ chance of survival before our seasonal blanket of snow. Water lawns, trees, shrubs and flower beds every week or two (depending on the weather) until the snow stays on the ground. Fall watering is especially important for evergreen trees.

Protect Trees and Shrubs:
Evergreens like spruce, pine and juniper lose moisture as their needles transpire through the winter. New evergreens are not able to keep up with the rate of moisture loss because their root systems are not yet deep enough. An anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ can be sprayed on evergreen needles mid to late October. Wilt Pruf™ helps slow down transpiration and can make the difference between brown, crispy needles or lush green needles next spring.

Protect trees and shrubs from browsing deer, moose or gnawing rodents with Plantskydd™ liquid or granular repellent. In cases with frequent large game browsing, seasonal fencing may be needed.

Voles can girdle and kill a tree overwinter by chewing the bark around the base of the trunk. Apples and crabapples are especially vulnerable. A rigid plastic trunk guard can be placed around the trunk to protect it. Remove the trunk guard the following spring to allow for airflow.

Mulch is useful to moderate soil temperatures, retain moisture and suppress weeds. Apply a 2-3 inch layer of mulch around the base of trees and shrubs, being careful not to pile it up right against the trunk.

Some deciduous trees like maples are prone to cracking over winter. Cracking is caused when the trunk heats up in the sun during the day and then cools off dramatically at night. The temperature difference causes vertical, spiraling cracks down the trunk. A lightweight tree wrap will help protect the trunk. Wrap trunks late fall and remove the wrap in the spring.

Spread wildflower and grass seed: Fall is one of the best times for seeding. Wildflower and grass seed will lay dormant until spring and germinate once the soil temperatures warm up. As a bonus, residual moisture from snowmelt and spring rains speed up germination.

Replenish veggie beds: Now great time to feed the soil in your veggie garden. After harvesting and cleaning up plant debris, spread a 2-4 inch layer of compost (we like Happy Frog or Black Gold brands) over top and work it into the top 6 inches or so with a spade or digging fork. Rake smooth and your beds will be ready to rock next season.
Note: Do this when the soil is dry to avoid a clumpy, muddy mess and to keep the soil from becoming compact.

Fertilize and protect your lawn: A late application of fall lawn fertilizer (or winterizer) will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and healthy new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health. To minimize vole damage, spread a repellant like Molemax™ or Reppelex™ over lawns.
Take advantage of fall sale pricing: Espoma™ organic fall lawn food is now 50%off.

23 Sep 2019

Fall Lawn Care

Even in cooler weather, lawn grasses are still growing, photosynthesizing and developing roots. A little extra love each fall helps your lawn to be healthy, lush and resilient.

-Continue to water your lawn to supplement natural rainfall.
-Mow your lawn slightly shorter than normal. Less top growth means less dead or moldy grass to rake up in the spring.
-A late application of fall lawn fertilizer will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and faster new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health. Go organic this year with Espoma organic Fall Lawn Winterizer.

-Protect against voles: Commercial repellents such as Molemax(tm) should be spread as late in the fall as possible. These products make turf less palatable to pesky voles, helping to lessen damage overwinter.
-Reseed any thin spots, dog spots or damaged areas in your lawn. Be sure to either add a light layer of topsoil or fluff up the soil in these areas with a rake.
-Rake up any thick mats of leaves that smother your lawn. You can also mow over your leafy areas to shred up the leaves.

16 Sep 2019

Five Shrubs for Fall Color:

Dwarf Honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera): This could be the top of the list of under-used shrubs. Also known as northern bush honeysuckle and bush honeysuckle, this is a hardy native shrub of eastern North America. Though not a true honeysuckle, it has honeysuckle-like yellow flowers mid through late summer. Dwarf honeysuckle is very adaptable and can grow in full sun or partial shade. It grows 3-4 feet tall and 3-5 feet wide. The real show starts late August with gorgeous flush of bronze, orange and red. Plant several together for a striking fall color punch.

Peking Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster acutifolia): This is a large shrub, growing up to 8-10 feet tall and 6-8 feet wide. Native to Siberia, this shrub is extremely hardy and adaptable to many soil types. It is densely branched making it excellent as a screen or hedge. Dark green leaves turn orangey-red early fall. Tiny white flowers early summer form dark red berries that birds love. Hedge cotoneaster (Cotoneaster lucida) shares these same attributes and can be used interchangeably with Peking cotoneaster.

Amur Maple (Acer ginalla sp.): If you are searching for a bright red fall exclamation point, this is your ticket. Amur maple is a large multi-stemmed shrub that can grow up to 15 feet tall and wide. Amur maple is native to northern Russia and Eastern Mongolia and is extremely cold hardy. Glossy, deep green leaves through the summer develop intense red fall color in September. Amur maple varieties include ‘flame’ and ‘compact’.

Black Chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa): Pretty clusters of white flowers in the spring are followed by black berries later in the summer that attracts birds. Glossy green foliage becomes brilliant orange in autumn. Black chokeberry is adaptable to wet or dry soils but prefers full sun. Grows up to 6 feet tall and wide.

Dogwood (Cornus sericea sp.): Dogwoods deserve a special mention, not because of their fall foliage color, but because of the colorful stems that remain once the foliage has fallen for the season. Gorgeous red or yellow branches add color to any landscape fall through the winter months. A mainstay for landscapes in our region, these durable native shrubs make great wildlife habitat and are adaptable to sun or shade.