The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
12 Nov 2018

Christmas Tree Care 101

The beloved Christmas tree is the mark of the season in many of our homes. To help your tree stay fresh, follow these steps:

Fresh Cut Trees:
• Cut a quarter to a half inch off the bottom of the trunk before placing it in its stand. This is vital to a tree’s ability to uptake water. We do this for you when you purchase your tree here.
• Choose a tree stand with at least a quart holding capacity for water. Fill with water and check daily. Cut trees can drink up to a gallon a day! Continue to add water as needed while your tree is indoors.
• Keep your tree away from any heat sources like fireplaces, appliances or heating vents.

Live Potted Christmas Trees:
Live Christmas trees need extra consideration for holiday decorating and care.
It is important to keep live trees in their dormant state for successful survival beyond the holidays. Gradually acclimate your live tree to room temperature by keeping it in a cool garage for a few days before bringing it indoors. Water your tree and allow it to drain before moving it indoors. Keep your tree indoors for no more than one week or it will break dormancy. Avoid placing your live tree by any heat source and use LED or mini lights that give off little heat. Before returning a live Christmas tree outside, water it thoroughly and move it somewhere cool like a garage before exposing it to winter temperatures. Keep your live tree for the remainder of the winter outdoors where it will have good snow coverage and some shade. This will offer it protection from the elements. Avoid placing your potted tree in a sunny spot or wind exposed area as this will dry out the needles. Once the ground is thawed in the spring, your live Christmas tree can be planted and enjoyed for years to come.
live trees are not guaranteed

31 Jan 2018

All About Air Plants

Air Plants

Also known as tillandsias or ‘tillies’, air plants are in the bromeliad family, the same as pineapples. You can see the resemblance to a pineapple top in many air plants species. Air plants are epiphytes, needing no soil in which to grow. All their nutrients come from the air, making them a versatile and easy plant to take care of. Although they live on air, they do need some attention to stay alive and thrive especially in our dry climate.
Daily misting is helpful, but a weekly soak is even better, submerging the air plant in room temperature water for an hour or so every week. If the plant has a bloom on it, try to avoid wetting the bloom. Gently shake off excess water to dry completely before placing it back on display. Any trapped water within the plant can cause rot. The leaves will feel stiffer and look a bit darker when they’re hydrated. Soft, shriveled or rolled leaves and paler foliage is a sign of dehydration. Air plants enjoy a brightly lit spot with good air circulation. They can adapt to a wide range of room temperatures from 50 to 90 degrees. Displaying air plants can be as simple as placing a few on a decorative plate or as elaborate as a Pinterest-worthy piece of art. Glass terrariums, mason jars, driftwood or decorative rocks are easy props for display. A simple search on Pinterest will give you a plethora of design ideas or allow your own creativity to have fun and run wild with amazing air plants!