The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
09 Jul 2020

Greenhouse

From early spring to late fall the greenhouse has a great selection of perennials and annuals that are sure to add color to your landscape. Perennials return year after year and are a mainstay for every garden; Annuals are a one-season-wonder. The Garden Center stocks a wide variety of healthy perennials that are hardy enough for the challenging high alpine climate of Teton Valley. From shade loving to drought resistant xeriscape plants, the MD Garden Center is a one-stop-shop for gardeners.

Starting with frost-hardy annuals in the spring, then moving to amazing hanging baskets and vegetables in late spring, and finally to brilliant flowers through the summer, our Garden Center is sure to please gardeners at every level.

09 Jul 2020

Gift Shop

At the MD Gift Shop you will find a great selection of unique gifts. The gift shop is adjacent to the Garden Center and is conveniently located on Highway 33 between Victor and Driggs, Idaho and less than 30 minutes from Jackson, Wyoming. Open year-round, Monday through Saturday. •Seasonal Home Décor •Kitchen Gifts: Mugs, Dish Towels, and Dishware for gift giving •Accessories: Scarves, Jewelry, and Hats •Picture Frames, Candles, and Artwork •Birding Accessories including Seed and Feeders •Books: Gardening, Children’s Books, and Cook Books •All Occasion Cards: Birthday, Anniversary, Congratulations, and More •Lotions, Soaps, and Body Care Products for Women and Men •Children’s Gifts: Babies to Tweens. Unique and Educational Gifts. •Houseplants: Available Year-Round •Holiday and Christmas Decorations

08 Jul 2020

Wild Weather Gardening

Perfect summer weather in our region is seldom long-lasting. Seasoned locals can tell the tales of late June freezes, snow on the fourth of July or winds that blew away the trampoline. Savvy gardeners are also studious weather observers, ready to act no matter what Ma Nature throws our way. Here are some of our common wild weather extremes and tips for damage control.

Snow: A light blanket of snow over blooming flowers and emerging leaves will do little damage, but accompanying cold temperatures can be an issue with tender annuals, hanging baskets and veggie gardens (see ‘frost’ in the following paragraph). Heavy snow on fully leafed-out trees and blooming flowers can topple whole trees, break branches and squish flowers. If it’s snowing and accumulating heavily, shaking branches free of snow can help reduce the weight and chance of breakage. After a summer snow storm, cut or prune anything damaged or broken. Healthy trees and plants will eventually re-grow.

Frost: The good news is that frosts are usually forecast. The bad news is that frost can happen any day of the summer. A daily habit of checking the weather forecast will arm you with the information needed to act. If/when frost is predicted, cover tender plants and veggie gardens with frost cloth (we sell DeWitt™ N-Sulate), an old sheet or a tarp. Harvest any ripe produce from your veggie garden and when possible, move tender hanging baskets and potted annuals indoors. Frost damage can be trimmed off with clean, sharp pruners. Perennials, trees and shrubs may be slightly damaged after a cold night, but usually will regrow.

Hail: This is probably the least predictable and most damaging weather event we can experience. If hail is imminent, take down exposed hanging baskets and cover veggie gardens with frost cloth, a tarp or an old sheet. Hail can tear holes in leaves and strip leaves off trees, shrubs and flowers. Extreme wind gusts can break branches. After a hail event, the best course of action is a good clean-up. With clean, sharp tools, trim branches, flower stems or anything broken. Rake up shredded leaves and plant bits. Fertilize everything with a low dose liquid plant food for additional energy.

Heat: Most mature plants can adapt to heat, but new plants with small root systems can struggle. Plants won’t bloom as well or develop fruit in hot weather. Regular watering early morning or evening hours is best. Be sure to water deeply at the root zone, not just wetting the foliage. Hanging baskets and plants in small containers can dry out very quickly. Some planters and baskets may even need to be moved into a protected shady spot for relief from the heat (this is also a good strategy when you’re gone for a few days). If plants get too dry, the tips will turn brown and crispy. In this case, cut off any of the damage, soak the plant thoroughly and fertilize with a mild liquid plant food.

Wind: Extreme winds associated with storms can break or damage tree limbs or other plants. Once the wind event is over, use clean sharp tools to trim anything broken or damaged. Continuous high winds can dry out hanging baskets or new plants in a snap. If possible, move plants to a sheltered spot such as a covered porch. If it’s not possible to move plants, be sure to water deeply at the root zone. During hot and windy weather, plants may wilt even though the roots are moist simply because they are transpiring (losing moisture from foliage) faster than they are able to take up water from their roots. Plants will usually rebound once the wind dies down and the day cools. If plants get too dry, the tips will turn brown and crispy. In this case, cut off any of the damage, soak the plant thoroughly and fertilize with a liquid plant food.

Fortunately, plants are very adaptable to many weather extremes and will put on new growth after being damaged. Routine maintenance will encourage healthy plants that are able to recover from weather extremes.

Links to regional weather forecasts:
National Weather Service:
Mountain Weather:
Teton Valley Weather:

19 May 2020

Veggie Garden Basics Part 2

Refresh your memory with Part 1 of our two-part post on Veggie Gardening.

Now that your veggie garden is growing, routine maintenance will keep it healthy for the best production.

Weed Control
Allow a bit of time daily to do a visual check on your garden. This will help you notice any changes or problems that may arise. Hand-pull weeds weekly before anything gets too big. A hoe or cultivator will help knock weeds down while they’re still small.

Irrigation
Veggies need daily water during the growing season. Getting out into the garden and hand watering every day is simple to do and is an excellent way to become aware of any weed or pest activity. Soaker hoses or drip lines require more set up and moving parts, but can save time once they’re installed. Be sure to inspect irrigation lines routinely to make sure there are no excessively dry or wet areas.

Fertilizer
Nutrient-rich soil is vital to productive veggie gardens. Adding compost or manure or some combination yearly will give you the best results.
Since veggies are heavy feeders, a routine application of fertilizer throughout the growing season is important for healthy plants, and a bountiful harvest. We stock a wide array of organic and conventional fertilizers available to the home gardener. A granular fertilizer can be added at planting time and will slowly feed throughout the season. Liquid fertilizers are fast acting for a quick boost, but will need to be reapplied.
Always read the label before applying of any kind fertilizer and follow the instructions precisely.
Learn more about fertilizers here

Pests
Plants that are well-maintained and healthy tend to have fewer problems with pests. If plants are stressed due to drought or crowding, they are more susceptible to insect infestations. However, even the best-kept gardens can have trouble with pests.
Here are some common offenders and treatment method. The products listed here are natural or organic controls:
• Flea beetles- These tiny insects are common on radish, arugula, lettuce, and beans. They are small, black beetles that fly and jump from host to host. If you’ve had trouble in the past, cover these crops right after planting with row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard). Safer™ End All insecticide can be applied if they become a problem.
• Cabbage moths- Row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard) will keep these little white moths from laying eggs on cruciferous (broccoli, kale, cabbage, cauliflowers) crops. A routine treatment of Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust) also helps.
• Cabbage Worms- These well-disguised caterpillars are the larvae of the previously mentioned moths. They chew up cruciferous crops and are often hard to spot until the damage is noticed. Use Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust)
• Aphids- These tiny insects are usually green and feed on crops by puncturing and sucking the nutrients from the foliage. They are often on inner leaves or on undersides, making them tough to spot. Knock aphid populations down with Safer™ Insecticidal Soap or a strong jet of water.
Always read the label before applying any kind of pesticide and follow the instructions precisely.

Harvesting
Harvesting and eating is the greatest thing about growing your own veggies.
It’s best to harvest veggies in the morning or during cool weather, so they will stay crisp and last longer.
Greens: Leaf lettuces, salad mixes, arugula, and spinach varieties can be cut with scissors as soon as they’re 2 or more inches tall. Cut young kale, chard and beet greens to add to salads. Harvest these until they ‘bolt’ or flower. Once they have bolted, they will be bitter.
Beans and Peas: Pick these often and the plants will produce for longer.
Summer Squash: Cut squash off the vine while they’re still small for best flavor.
Tomatoes: pick as they ripen, but they will continue to ripen at room temperature off the vine. Pay attention to late summer and early fall temperatures and pick your tomatoes before they freeze.
Kale and Swiss chard: Harvest early summer for salads or late season for larger leaves.
Carrots, Beets, and Potatoes: Most varieties are best harvested in the fall during cool, dry weather.
Cabbage: Harvest after a few frosts for the best flavor.

You’ll find it hard to buy veggies from the store that match the flavor of home grown. With some patience, care, and knowledge, you’ll be able to enjoy your bounty for years to come!

24 Mar 2020

Veggie Garden Basics, part 1:

Veggie gardening is a growing trend for so many reasons: sustainability, stress reduction, wellness, economy, variety, and taste are just some of the benefits of growing vegetables at home. Doing your homework and preparing a plan before you start really pays off in the productivity of your garden. Here is part one of a two-part series intended to guide rookie gardeners and serve as a resource for the seasoned gardeners. Entire books are written about vegetable gardening and this information is only meant to be a starting point and a general guideline.

Site Selection:
A good site is probably the best thing you can do to ensure veggie gardening success. Choose a site with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight and good drainage with no low, wet areas. If possible, choose a site sheltered from the wind. Try to stay away from trees and shrubs that send up shoots such as aspens, cottonwoods or chokecherries. Be sure there is convenient access to water. One of the biggest rookie mistakes is to start too big. Keep your garden small at first and expand as you learn what works for you.
Pro Tip: Position a garden near a south-facing wall or fence for additional radiant heat.

Soil Prep:
Next to site selection, soil quality will determine the productivity of your garden. Loose, well-draining soil rich in organic matter is key. If you are digging up a new site, add lots of organic material (compost, well-aged manure, soil conditioner) to improve soil condition, fertility, drainage, nutrient and water holding ability. If you are filling raised beds, aim for about a fifty-fifty mix of topsoil and organic material (compost, well-aged manure, soil conditioner). Plan to amend the soil in your veggie garden yearly (either in spring or fall) with more organic matter to replenish nutrients lost by cultivation.
If you are planting any heavy feeders such as squash, cucumbers or melons, add a granular fertilizer made for veggies (lots of fertilizer options for organic or conventional gardens, stop in the greenhouse and we can point you in the right direction).
Pro Tip: Soil can be warmed up faster in springtime by placing a layer of clear plastic over top for a few days before planting.

Garden Layout:
If possible, consider building raised beds for gardening. Raised beds offer better drainage, warm up earlier and require is less bending and kneeling. Lining Raised beds with hardware cloth will help keep pesky critters from coming into your garden beds. Keep any paths or walkways between raised beds wide enough to walk through with a wheelbarrow. Don’t plant tall plants or build trellises where they will shade other plants.
Pro Tip: Plant crops in a different spot in the garden each year. Rotating crops like this helps reduce pests and diseases that may linger in the soil.
See example below:

Planting Seeds:
Seeds are amazing wonders of Nature. To germinate and grow, they need soil, water, and light. Certain seeds (such as beans and squash) will only germinate when the soil temperature is warmer, others (peas, carrots) don’t mind getting started in cool soil. Get in the habit of reading the seed packet. The packet will include important information such as when to plant, seed spacing and ‘days to harvest’. It’s best to choose shorter ‘days to harvest’ varieties. Long season crops such as broccoli, cabbage, tomatoes, and peppers can either be started indoors or purchased as seedlings from the garden center.
There are countless varieties of seed to choose from, and it’s easy to get overwhelmed and try to grow too many things. For beginners, start off small and grow something easy (lettuce, radishes, salad greens), grow something you like to eat, and grow something simple (kale, Swiss chard).
Pro tip: Don’t worry if you get started later in the season. As soil temperatures warm up, seeds planted later will often catch up to those planted early because they germinate and grow faster in warmer soil.

Planting Guideline: Here’s a general guideline for the planting of common veggies in the Tetons. Refer to the information provided on the seed package for specific instructions.
Cool Weather Crops (Mid-April & May Planting):
– Spinach
– Peas
– Carrots
– Most lettuces and salad greens
– Radish
– Kale
– Carrots
– Broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower
– Potatoes
– Beets

Warm Weather Crops (first or second week of June):
– Tomatoes
– Beans
– Squash (zucchini, yellow squash, winter squash)
– Cucumbers
Pro tip: In Teton Valley, old-timers wait until the aspens have leafed out halfway up the mountainsides out before planting their first crops.
Bonus Pro Tip: Cheat the season and try planting your warm-weather crops a week early. Sometimes you can get away with it!

30 Sep 2019

October Checklist:

It’s a great month to tackle fall yard projects. Some effort this fall will set up your landscape for success and beauty next season and will shorten the to-do list next spring.

Cut back perennial flowers: Once the foliage is brown, perennials can be cut to the ground. Consider leaving some sturdy perennials standing in place for late fall and winter interest. Sedums, coneflower, Russian sage and ornamental grasses can be left standing and look beautiful with a dusting of snow or frost. Cutting back other perennials flowers will save you the task next spring.

Plant spring-flowering bulbs: Wake up your garden next spring with colorful daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and tulips. Spring-blooming bulbs add the color you’ll be craving after winter and provide an early season food source for pollinating insects. Plant bulbs any time in October and enjoy pops of color for years to come.

Plant garlic: Hardy and full-flavored, homegrown garlic is one of the easiest crops to grow. Begin by preparing the soil. It should be about 12 inches deep and amended with compost. Choose garlic varieties meant for planting, not the grocery-store kind. We have a great selection of cold-hardy, gourmet garlic. Separate garlic into cloves. Plant each clove pointy side up about 4 inches deep and 4 to 6 inches apart. One head of garlic will typically yield 8-10 heads next year. Water thoroughly. The garlic will sprout next spring and be ready to harvest late summer.
Water: A cold dry fall can be deadly for many ornamental plants. Well-hydrated roots increase a plants’ chance of survival before our seasonal blanket of snow. Water lawns, trees, shrubs and flower beds every week or two (depending on the weather) until the snow stays on the ground. Fall watering is especially important for evergreen trees.

Protect Trees and Shrubs:
Evergreens like spruce, pine and juniper lose moisture as their needles transpire through the winter. New evergreens are not able to keep up with the rate of moisture loss because their root systems are not yet deep enough. An anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ can be sprayed on evergreen needles mid to late October. Wilt Pruf™ helps slow down transpiration and can make the difference between brown, crispy needles or lush green needles next spring.

Protect trees and shrubs from browsing deer, moose or gnawing rodents with Plantskydd™ liquid or granular repellent. In cases with frequent large game browsing, seasonal fencing may be needed.

Voles can girdle and kill a tree overwinter by chewing the bark around the base of the trunk. Apples and crabapples are especially vulnerable. A rigid plastic trunk guard can be placed around the trunk to protect it. Remove the trunk guard the following spring to allow for airflow.

Mulch is useful to moderate soil temperatures, retain moisture and suppress weeds. Apply a 2-3 inch layer of mulch around the base of trees and shrubs, being careful not to pile it up right against the trunk.

Some deciduous trees like maples are prone to cracking over winter. Cracking is caused when the trunk heats up in the sun during the day and then cools off dramatically at night. The temperature difference causes vertical, spiraling cracks down the trunk. A lightweight tree wrap will help protect the trunk. Wrap trunks late fall and remove the wrap in the spring.

Spread wildflower and grass seed: Fall is one of the best times for seeding. Wildflower and grass seed will lay dormant until spring and germinate once the soil temperatures warm up. As a bonus, residual moisture from snowmelt and spring rains speed up germination.

Replenish veggie beds: Now great time to feed the soil in your veggie garden. After harvesting and cleaning up plant debris, spread a 2-4 inch layer of compost (we like Happy Frog or Black Gold brands) over top and work it into the top 6 inches or so with a spade or digging fork. Rake smooth and your beds will be ready to rock next season.
Note: Do this when the soil is dry to avoid a clumpy, muddy mess and to keep the soil from becoming compact.

Fertilize and protect your lawn: A late application of fall lawn fertilizer (or winterizer) will give your lawn a boost next spring with a quick green-up and healthy new growth. Fall fertilizer has the addition of potassium for strong root development and overall health. To minimize vole damage, spread a repellant like Molemax™ or Reppelex™ over lawns.
Take advantage of fall sale pricing: Espoma™ organic fall lawn food is now 50%off.

01 Mar 2019

Quick and Dirty Gardening Basics

Volumes of books have been written about gardening. But what do you really need to know to be successful? Here’s our version of the basics:

– Location: Most veggie and fruiting plants will need at least 6 hours of full sun daily. Perennials and annuals are more adaptable.
– Soil: Healthy soil equates to healthy plants. Adding compost will feed your soil and in turn feed your plants. Do this yearly in veggie gardens and at planting time for perennials, shrubs and trees. Choose a quality potting mix for planters.
-Seed and Plant Selection: For seeds, pick those with a shorter ‘days to harvest’ on the label. Plant fresh seed that is labeled for the current year each season. Select perennials, shrubs and trees known to grow well in our area and that are the correct USDA zones (zones 2-4).
– Watering: Watering needs will vary depending on your plant selection, stage and location. Generally, the larger the roots (trees) the less frequent watering they will need. A tiny root system (a germinating seed) will need more frequent watering. Water early in the morning to allow the foliage to dry during the day and for less waste from evaporation.
-Feeding: A yearly application of fertilizer in spring will help keep plants vigorous and healthy. Some veggies like beans, squash, corn and tomatoes are heavy feeders and may need additional fertilizer throughout the growing season.
-Be watchful: A quick check every few days for bugs or other issues will help spot trouble before it gets out of control. Keep an eye on the weather and be ready to cover up any tender plants with frost cloth when a temperature dip is predicted.

No two gardens are alike and no two seasons are alike. Learn as you go and enjoy!

23 Jan 2019

The Snack Garden

Feeling a bit hungry? Just walk out to your Snack Garden and pluck a few berries or veggies. These foods can be foraged right from your yard and require little or no chopping, washing, cooking or fuss. Snacks from the garden don’t come in plastic wrappers and are 100% healthy. The best part though is the flavor. Home grown food just tastes better. This garden could be planted in a raised bed, containers, in a greenhouse or incorporated throughout your landscaping. From vine to mouth with little or no prep, this garden would fit the bill for a busy family.
Snack Garden plants:
My absolute must-haves are snap peas and cherry tomatoes, but any or all of these would make fine Snack Garden picks.
– Snap peas
-Broccoli
-Carrots
-Radishes
-Cherry tomatoes
-Berries (strawberries, raspberries, currants, gooseberries and serviceberries)
-Apples
The Set-Up:
This idea is very flexible depending on what you have in place or how extensive you’d like to go.
Most of the veggies will do best in a raised bed in full sun. Tomatoes grow well in big containers like an EarthBox™ or even a used plastic nursery pot. Strawberries and raspberries need a patch of their own to sprawl. Currants, gooseberries and serviceberries and apple trees can be planted throughout your existing landscaping or set apart in a place of their own.

18 May 2018

Veggie Garden Basics Part 2

Now that your veggie garden is growing, routine maintenance will keep it healthy for the best production.

Weed Control
Allow a bit of time daily to do a walk by your garden. This will help you notice any changes or problems that may arise. Hand pull weeds weekly before anything gets out of hand. A hoe or cultivator will help knock weeds down while they’re still small. For anything really tenacious use a chemical but try to keep it organic.

Irrigation
Veggies need daily water during the growing season. Getting out into the garden and hand watering every day is simple to do and is an excellent way to become aware of any weed or pest activity. Soaker hoses or drip lines can be helpful but require more set up and moving parts. Be sure to inspect this type of irrigation routinely to make sure there are no excessively dry or wet areas. Manual and electrical timers can be useful.

Pests
Each season, an array of pests attack veggie gardens. Here are some of the common ones and treatment method. The products listed here are natural or organic controls.
• Flea beetles- These tiny insects are common on radish, arugula, lettuce and beans. If you’ve had trouble in the past, cover these crops soon after planting with row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard). Safer™ End All can be applied if they become a problem.
• Cabbage moths- Row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard) will keep these little white moths from laying eggs on cruciferous crops. A routine treatment of Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust) also helps.
• Cabbage Worms- Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust)
• Potato beetles- Spray with Safer™ End All or hand picking.
• Aphids- Knock them down with Safer™ Insecticidal Soap or a strong jet of water.
Always read the label before applying any kind of pesticide and follow the instructions precisely.

Fertilizer
As was mentioned in part 1, nutrient-rich soil is vital to productive veggie gardens. Adding compost or manure or some combination yearly will give you the best results.
Since veggies are heavy feeders, a routine application of fertilizer throughout the growing season is important for healthy plants and a bountiful harvest. We stock wide array of organic and conventional fertilizers available to the home gardener. A granular fertilizer can be added at planting time and will slowly feed throughout the season. Liquid fertilizers are fast acting and will need to be reapplied. By law, companies are required to list the N-P-K composition on their product. These will be listed as numbers such as 10-15-6.
• N-Nitrogen-Important for greening up.
• P-Phosphate-Important for rooting, blooming and fruiting.
• K-Potassium-Important for overall vigor.
• Micronutrients are also important for plant and soil health.
Always read the label before applying any kind fertilizer and follow the instructions precisely.

Harvesting
Harvesting and eating is the greatest thing about growing your own veggies.
It’s best to harvest veggies in the morning or during cool weather, so they will stay crisp and last longer.
Greens: Leaf lettuces, salad mixes, arugula and spinach varieties can be cut with scissors as soon as they’re 2 or more inches tall. Cut young kale, chard and beet greens to add to salads. Harvest these until they ‘bolt’ or flower. Once they have bolted, they will be bitter.
Beans and Peas: Pick these often and the plants will produce for longer.
Summer Squash: Cut off the vine while they’re still small for best flavor.
Tomatoes: pick as they ripen, but they will continue to ripen at room temperature off the vine. Pay attention to late summer and early fall temperatures and pick your tomatoes before they freeze.
Kale and Swiss chard: Can be harvested early summer for salads or late summer/ early fall for larger leaves.
Carrots, Beets and Potatoes: Most varieties are best harvested in the fall during cool, dry weather.
Cabbage: Harvest after a few frosts for best flavor.
You’ll find it hard to buy veggies from the store that match the flavor of home grown. With some patience, care and knowledge, you’ll be able to enjoy your bounty for years to come!