The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
18 Apr 2019

Greenhouse

From early spring to late fall the greenhouse has a great selection of perennials and annuals that are sure to add color to your landscape. Perennials return year after year and are a mainstay for every garden; Annuals are a one-season-wonder. The Garden Center stocks a wide variety of healthy perennials that are hardy enough for the challenging high alpine climate of Teton Valley. From shade loving to drought resistant xeriscape plants, the MD Garden Center is a one-stop-shop for gardeners.

Starting with frost-hardy annuals in the spring, then moving to amazing hanging baskets and vegetables in late spring, and finally to brilliant flowers through the summer, our Garden Center is sure to please gardeners at every level.

18 Apr 2019

Gift Shop

At the MD Gift Shop you will find a great selection of unique gifts. The gift shop is adjacent to the Garden Center and is conveniently located on Highway 33 between Victor and Driggs, Idaho and less than 30 minutes from Jackson, Wyoming. Open year-round, Monday through Saturday. •Seasonal Home Décor •Kitchen Gifts: Mugs, Dish Towels, and Dishware for gift giving •Accessories: Scarves, Jewelry, and Hats •Picture Frames, Candles, and Artwork •Birding Accessories including Seed and Feeders •Books: Gardening, Children’s Books, and Cook Books •All Occasion Cards: Birthday, Anniversary, Congratulations, and More •Lotions, Soaps, and Body Care Products for Women and Men •Children’s Gifts: Babies to Tweens. Unique and Educational Gifts. •Houseplants: Available Year-Round •Holiday and Christmas Decorations

01 Mar 2019

Quick and Dirty Gardening Basics

Volumes of books have been written about gardening. But what do you really need to know to be successful? Here’s our version of the basics:

– Location: Most veggie and fruiting plants will need at least 6 hours of full sun daily. Perennials and annuals are more adaptable.
– Soil: Healthy soil equates to healthy plants. Adding compost will feed your soil and in turn feed your plants. Do this yearly in veggie gardens and at planting time for perennials, shrubs and trees. Choose a quality potting mix for planters.
-Seed and Plant Selection: For seeds, pick those with a shorter ‘days to harvest’ on the label. Plant fresh seed that is labeled for the current year each season. Select perennials, shrubs and trees known to grow well in our area and that are the correct USDA zones (zones 2-4).
– Watering: Watering needs will vary depending on your plant selection, stage and location. Generally, the larger the roots (trees) the less frequent watering they will need. A tiny root system (a germinating seed) will need more frequent watering. Water early in the morning to allow the foliage to dry during the day and for less waste from evaporation.
-Feeding: A yearly application of fertilizer in spring will help keep plants vigorous and healthy. Some veggies like beans, squash, corn and tomatoes are heavy feeders and may need additional fertilizer throughout the growing season.
-Be watchful: A quick check every few days for bugs or other issues will help spot trouble before it gets out of control. Keep an eye on the weather and be ready to cover up any tender plants with frost cloth when a temperature dip is predicted.

No two gardens are alike and no two seasons are alike. Learn as you go and enjoy!

23 Jan 2019

The Snack Garden

Feeling a bit hungry? Just walk out to your Snack Garden and pluck a few berries or veggies. These foods can be foraged right from your yard and require little or no chopping, washing, cooking or fuss. Snacks from the garden don’t come in plastic wrappers and are 100% healthy. The best part though is the flavor. Home grown food just tastes better. This garden could be planted in a raised bed, containers, in a greenhouse or incorporated throughout your landscaping. From vine to mouth with little or no prep, this garden would fit the bill for a busy family.
Snack Garden plants:
My absolute must-haves are snap peas and cherry tomatoes, but any or all of these would make fine Snack Garden picks.
– Snap peas
-Broccoli
-Carrots
-Radishes
-Cherry tomatoes
-Berries (strawberries, raspberries, currants, gooseberries and serviceberries)
-Apples
The Set-Up:
This idea is very flexible depending on what you have in place or how extensive you’d like to go.
Most of the veggies will do best in a raised bed in full sun. Tomatoes grow well in big containers like an EarthBox™ or even a used plastic nursery pot. Strawberries and raspberries need a patch of their own to sprawl. Currants, gooseberries and serviceberries and apple trees can be planted throughout your existing landscaping or set apart in a place of their own.

18 May 2018

Vegetable Gardening Basics Part 2

Now that your garden is growing, it’s time to maintain it for the best results!
WEED CONTROL

• Allow a bit of time daily to do a walk by your garden. This will help you notice any changes or problems that may arise.
• Mulching will help control weeds- use compost, dried grass, straw, or plastic.
• Hand pull weeds weekly before anything gets out of hand.
• A hoe or cultivator will help knock weeds down while they’re still small.
• For anything really tenacious use a chemical but try to keep it organic.

IRRIGATION

• Soaker hoses or drip lines on timers are the easiest.
• Getting out into the garden and hand watering every day is the best way to become aware of any weed or pest activity.

PESTS

Each season, an array of pests attack veggie gardens. Here are some of the common ones and treatment method. The products listed here are natural or organic controls.

• Flea beetles- These tiny insects are common on radish, arugula, lettuce and beans. If you’ve had trouble in the past, cover these crops soon after planting with row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard). Safer™ End All can be applied if they become a problem.
• Cabbage moths- Row cover (Dewitt™ Seed Guard) will keep these little white moths from laying eggs on cruciferous crops. A routine treatment of Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust) also helps.
• Cabbage Worms- Bt (Safer™ Garden Dust)
• Potato beetles- Spray with Safer™ End All or hand picking.
• Aphids- Knock them down with Safer™ Insecticidal Soap or a strong jet of water.

FERTILIZERS

As was mentioned in part 1, nutrient-rich soil is vital to productive veggie gardens. Adding compost or manure or some combination yearly will give you the best results.

Since veggies are heavy feeders, a routine application of fertilizer throughout the growing season is important for healthy plants and a bountiful harvest. We stock wide array of organic and conventional fertilizers available to the home gardener. A granular fertilizer can be added at planting time and will slowly feed throughout the season. Liquid fertilizers are fast acting and will need to be reapplied. By law, companies are required to list the N-P-K composition on their product. These will be listed as numbers such as 10-15-6.

• N-Nitrogen-Important for greening up.
• P-Phosphate-Important for rooting, blooming and fruiting.
• K-Potassium-Important for overall vigor.
• Micronutrients are also important for plant and soil health.

Always read the label before applying any kind of pesticide or fertilizer and follow the instructions precisely.

HARVESTING
It’s best to harvest veggies in the morning or during cool weather, so they will stay crisp and last longer.
Greens: Leaf lettuces, salad mixes, arugula and spinach varieties can be cut with scissors as soon as they’re 2 or more inches tall. Cut young kale, chard and beet greens to add to salads. Harvest these until they ‘bolt’ or flower. Once they have bolted, they will be bitter.
Beans and Peas: Pick these often and the plants will produce for longer.
Summer Squash: Cut off the vine while they’re still small for best flavor.
Tomatoes: pick as they ripen, but they will continue to ripen at room temperature off the vine. Pay attention to late summer and early fall temperatures and pick your tomatoes before they freeze.
Kale and Swiss chard: Can be harvested early summer for salads or late summer/ early fall for larger leaves.
Carrots, Beets and Potatoes: Most varieties are best harvested in the fall during cool, dry weather.
Cabbage: Harvest after a few frosts for best flavor.

You’ll find it hard to buy veggies from the store that match the flavor of home grown. With some patience, care and knowledge, you’ll be able to enjoy your bounty for years to come!

18 Apr 2018

Vegetable Gardening Basics Part 1

Vegetable gardening is a growing trend for so many reasons: health, economy, variety and taste are just some of benefits to growing vegetables at home. A bit of planning up front really pays off in the productivity of your garden. Here is part one of a two part series intended to guide those beginner gardeners or serve as a resource for those who have experience.
SELECT YOUR SITE
• Choose a site with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight and good drainage with no low, wet areas.
• If possible, choose a site sheltered from wind and near a south facing wall for radiant heat.
• Try to stay away from trees and shrubs that send up shoots such as aspens, cottonwoods or chokecherries.
• Keep your garden small at first and expand as you learn what works for you.
SOIL PREP
• The soil should be dry before being worked to avoid compaction.
• Add lots of organic material (compost, aged manure, shredded leaves) to improve soil condition, fertility, drainage, nutrient and water holding ability.
• If you are planting any heavy feeders such as squash, cucumbers or melons, add a granular fertilizer made for veggies such as Alaska™ Tomato & Veg fertilizer
• Soil can be warmed up faster by putting a layer of clear plastic over it for a few days before planting.

GARDEN LAYOUT
• If possible, consider building raised beds for gardening. There will be better drainage, the beds warm up earlier and there is less bending or kneeling.
• Don’t plant tall plants or build trellises where they will shade other plants.
• Crop rotation is important for healthy crops. Try not to plant the same vegetable in the same place year after year.
• Keep any paths or walkways wide enough for a wheelbarrow.

PLANTING SEEDS
• Seeds need four things for germination:
-dirt
-water
-light
-the right soil temperature
• Follow the instructions on the seed packet.
• Choose seeds that have a short days to germination time and a short days to harvest time, all this information will be on the seed packet
• Spinach, peas, potatoes, radish, and greens like kale, Swiss chard and arugula can be planted late April through May.
• Wait until June to plant warm season veggies like beans and squash.
• Many vegetables are available as seedlings or starts. Long-season veggies like tomatoes, cabbages, broccoli and peppers are best to plant from starts.

31 Jan 2018

All About Air Plants

Air Plants

Also known as tillandsias or ‘tillies’, air plants are in the bromeliad family, the same as pineapples. You can see the resemblance to a pineapple top in many air plants species. Air plants are epiphytes, needing no soil in which to grow. All their nutrients come from the air, making them a versatile and easy plant to take care of. Although they live on air, they do need some attention to stay alive and thrive especially in our dry climate.
Daily misting is helpful, but a weekly soak is even better, submerging the air plant in room temperature water for an hour or so every week. If the plant has a bloom on it, try to avoid wetting the bloom. Gently shake off excess water to dry completely before placing it back on display. Any trapped water within the plant can cause rot. The leaves will feel stiffer and look a bit darker when they’re hydrated. Soft, shriveled or rolled leaves and paler foliage is a sign of dehydration. Air plants enjoy a brightly lit spot with good air circulation. They can adapt to a wide range of room temperatures from 50 to 90 degrees. Displaying air plants can be as simple as placing a few on a decorative plate or as elaborate as a Pinterest-worthy piece of art. Glass terrariums, mason jars, driftwood or decorative rocks are easy props for display. A simple search on Pinterest will give you a plethora of design ideas or allow your own creativity to have fun and run wild with amazing air plants!

08 Jun 2017

Kids in the Garden

 

It’s nothing new, but we all know that children today are beset by a number of ailments: stress, obesity, ADHD. Research has shown that kids with access to greenspace such as gardens on a daily basis have reaped many health benefits including increased attention span and deeper forms of creative play. Children who grow their own vegetables are more likely to eat them. How are parents to encourage kids to get outside and garden? Here are a few tips:

·         Give a child their very own planting space to plant and dig as they please.

·         Plant veggies kids like to eat such as carrots, sugar snap peas, strawberries and potatoes.

·         Try planting crazy veggies like purple potatoes, atomic red carrots or dragon’s tongue beans.

·         Create a theme garden. Popular themes include a pizza patch, hummingbird habitat or a fairy garden.

·         Invest in some basic pint- sized tools. Gloves, shovels and buckets are a good start.

·         Incorporate some family- friendly features into your existing garden. Birdbaths, houses and feeders, gathering areas such as a dining set or bench, play areas such as a sandbox, fort or swing set.

·         Involve your kids in harvesting. Kids love to pick peas, dig up potatoes, pull carrots and cut lettuce.

·         Pass the scissors.  Older children can cut some salad greens or some flowers to bring into the house.

·         Hand them the hose! Very small kids are delighted to fill up a watering can and water something. Bigger kids can use the hose to fill birdbaths and water the veggie patch.

·         Lead by example. Your kids are more likely to garden if you’re out there too!

 

       

 

 

19 Mar 2017

Seed Starting 101

 

 

Longer season veggies such as tomatoes, winter squash, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and peppers are best started indoors anywhere from 8 to 10 weeks before the last frost date. Generally, mid to late March is a good time to start these crops.

  • Begin with a clean seedling tray or small pots. Ensure there are holes for drainage.
  • Select a sunny, warm spot away from hot or cold drafts.
  • Use high quality seedling mix and dampen the mix before you fill your containers. Do not use garden soil or compost, as these may contain harmful pathogens or fungi.
  • Using a pen or chopstick, make a ¼ inch hole and plant one or two seeds in each hole.
  • Gently top each hole with more seedling mix.
  • A clear plastic top can be used to retain moisture during germination.
  • Ensure the soil stays moist, but not soggy. A plant mister works well for this.
  • Once plants have reached about 2-3 inches and have several sets of true leaves, they can be transplanted into larger containers.

Not all seeds benefit from an early start. The following seeds are best sown directly into the garden at planting time: Beans, peas, carrots, beets, radish and turnips.  Leafy greens such as chard, kale and spinach and zucchini are easily grown from seed outdoors and don’t need to be started indoors.

We have everything you need to start a seed! Come by and see our large selection of garden seeds, seedling mixes, seed starting kits and more!