The region's premier landscape contractor & garden center
2389 S. Highway 33, Driggs, ID
Mon-Sat: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
12 Nov 2019

Trees

Here at MD Nursery & Landscaping, we have vast experience in installing trees in the challenging terrain and climate of eastern Idaho and Wyoming. Our highly trained staff will guide you in the proper selection of trees for your landscape to ensure a lifetime of beauty.

We also own and operate our own tree farms. With this the MD team knows that the trees we use in your landscape are acclimated to this area’s elevation and climate. Our tree farm offers a large selection of plant material from ornamental to deciduous & conifers.

We at MD Landscaping are capable of harvesting native trees through the use of our large spades. Whether you are looking to add large trees to your landscape or you need large trees removed, we have the crews and equipment to get the job done. We are able to spade up to 30 foot conifers and 10 inch caliper deciduous trees.

12 Nov 2019

Tree & Shrub Care

It’s important for your trees and shrubs to be maintained each year. To do this we cut out any dead, diseased, or overgrown branches on your trees and shrubs. We offer a wide variety of ornamental, deciduous, and conifer trees and shrubs for any landscaping project as well. So whether you plant it or we do, you can rest assured that the tree and shrub selection you will find are healthy and zoned for the area. We fertilize yearly for healthy trees and shrubs. And deep root feeding delivers nutrients straight to the root zone, keeping the trees and shrubs in tip-top condition.

From simple pest control to heavy duty treatments, we’ll make sure that you’re taken care of. Preventative spray for pine weevil is done in the early spring, and other pesticide treatments are available for specific pests. All pesticides are applied by our certified professionals following standard protocols.

Protecting your valuable trees from big game damage will save money and frustration. We install seasonal fencing around high value trees to prevent damage.

The MD service team can handle any size landscape from 20-acre plus private estates to small home gardens. You can feel confident that your landscape will be properly maintained and flourish under MD’s care.

12 Nov 2019

Power Raking and Aeration

Come early spring our power raking machines will pull up dead grass, which prepares lawns for new growth.

Lawn aeration punches small holes into a lawn allowing for more oxygen and water penetration to the root zone. It helps you maintain a beautiful, green lawn every year. *Aeration is best done in the fall.

The MD service team can handle any size landscape from 20-acre plus private estates to small home gardens. You can feel confident that your landscape will be properly maintained and flourish under MD’s care.

12 Nov 2019

Trees & Shrubs

The MD Garden Center offers a wide variety of ornamental, deciduous, and conifer trees and shrubs for any landscaping project. Whether you plant it or we do you can rest assured that the tree and shrub selection you will find here are healthy and zoned for this area.

12 Nov 2019

Tree Moving

We’re capable of moving big trees through the use of our large spades. So whether you are looking to add large trees to your landscape or you need large trees removed, we have the crews and equipment to do the job right. We are able to spade up to 30 foot conifers and 1 inch caliper deciduous trees.

20 Sep 2017

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Protecting your Landscape from Big Game Damage

Throughout our region we are fortunate enough to encounter all kinds of wildlife. They inhabited this area first and we over took their migration paths and feeding grounds. As majestic as they are, moose, elk, deer and even buffalo can wreak havoc on newly planted and established landscapes. Big game animals tend to be in our neighborhoods in the fall, winter and spring. As the snow melts, they return to higher elevations for the summer months.
There are a few strategies to deter wildlife from our landscapes. Use these strategies alone or in combination to protect your valuable landscape from big game damage.

Use Wildlife-Resistant Plants:
No plant is ‘wildlife-proof’. If animals are starving, they will eat anything available. However, some plants tend to be less palatable to wildlife. If your home is in an area frequented by wildlife, avoid disappointment by choosing these plants:
• Spruce
• Buffaloberry
• Cotoneaster
• Juniper
• Lilac
• Potentilla
• Serviceberry
• Spirea
• Viburnum
• Hawthorne

Apples, crabapples, birch, willow, roses and dogwood are best avoided as these are preferred by wildlife.
For a complete list, click here: http://dev.mdlandscapinginc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/GardeningAroundDeer.pdf

Repellents:
Commercially made repellants such as Plantskydd™ are effective when applied as directed. Apply repellants at intervals throughout season for best results.

Scare Tactics:
Wildlife don’t like unfamiliar sounds, lights or movement. Lights on motion sensors or a well-trained barking dog can be helpful.

Predator Urine:
This is a natural way of keeping wildlife out of your yard. A few drops in placed in strategic areas around your property can keep game out for 1-3 weeks. Animals eventually get used to the scent and other tactics need to be used at this point. Available from predatorpee.com.

Wildlife Fencing:
A physical barrier has proved time and time again to be the most reliable way to keep big game away from your plants. Fence off individual trees, groups of trees or entire properties.

Dealing with wildlife can be tricky.  On one hand you want to protect the investment of your landscape while being as respectful to nature as possible. Being flexible and ready to use multiple strategies is often the best approach to dealing with wildlife on your property.

01 Sep 2017

5 Reasons to Plant Trees this Fall

 

Did that spring planting project go unfinished? Have you been away most of the summer? Was it too hot to plant? Whatever your reason, September is here and it’s a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs. Here’s why:

1)      Less Stress:

Cooler temperatures mean less evaporation and trees don’t have to work as hard draw in water and nutrients.

2)      Warm Ground Temperatures:

Even as the air temperatures drop, the ground is still warm. The warm earth allows for good root formation, even after the foliage drops.

3)      Ready to Grow:

Trees and shrubs planted in the fall have acclimated to local temperature, daylight and moisture conditions. Once the ground warms up again in the spring, these trees will be ready to grow. As an added bonus, spring snowmelt helps keep the root zone moist.

4)      Fall Specials:

Fall is a great time to shop. All container trees and shrubs are 20% off.

5)      One Less Spring Project:

Shorten your to-do list for next spring. You’ll be glad you took the time and energy to plant trees.

Continue to keep newly planted trees and shrubs moist until the ground is frozen in late fall. Hand watering may be necessary after your irrigation has been turned off. At least two inches of mulch should be applied over the top of the root ball to maintain even temperatures and moisture. Evergreens are especially prone to moisture loss and browning over the winter months, so be extra diligent in providing ample water until the ground is frozen.  For extra protection, spray new evergreens with an anti-desiccant like Wilt Pruf™ in October.

08 May 2017

Tree Planting 101

Spring is an excellent time to plant trees. Whether you are planting a showy crabapple, a big spruce or a shady grove of aspen trees, the following tips will give newly planted trees the best chance for success:

·         Carefully choose the right site. Ensure the spot you want to plant a tree will accommodate its eventual size. The cute little Colorado spruce you purchased in a 5 gallon pot will not seem that cute anymore when it’s 20 feet tall and blocking your Teton views!

·         Not too deep, not too shallow. Renting a backhoe to dig some planting holes? Great, but beware of plunging your tree too deeply into the earth. The top of the root ball should be level with the top of your planting hole. Dig the hole twice as wide as the root ball. This allows for proper oxygen exchange and drainage.

·         Amend the soil. Adding a soil amendment (like compost or bark and steer) to the soil as you backfill around your tree will provide nutrients to the roots and help retain soil moisture.

·         Mulch. Cover the top of the root ball with 2-3 inches of mulch, being careful to keep the mulch pulled away from the main trunk. Mulch helps young trees by moderating soil temperatures, retaining soil moisture and suppressing weeds. Form the mulch into a ring around the root ball to create a built-in saucer that captures water and keeps it over the root zone.

·         To stake or not? New trees benefit from staking especially in windy areas or if the tree is top heavy. Two or three stakes should be installed around the tree. Secure the trunk with a broad tree strap or a loop of old garden hose. Never tie directly to the trunk with rope, twine or wire as this will damage the trunk and possibly girdle and kill the tree.  Fasten the trunk to the stakes loosely enough to allow some trunk movement.  This helps to develop a stronger trunk. Remove the stakes after the tree can stand up on its own, usually in one or two seasons.

·         Mycorrhizae. This naturally occurring beneficial fungus helps a tree’s roots grow bigger allowing for better moisture and nutrient uptake. Although it exists in the soil, the addition of supplemental mycorrhizae like Myke™ will increase a tree’s survival rate.

·         Fertilizer. Newly planted trees benefit from a mild fertilizer to help form roots. We recommend Fertilome™ Root Stimulator.

·         Water. This is vital to any tree’s survival. A deep thorough soaking about once a week for the first season will promote deep rooting.  The soil should be moistened at least 8 inches under the surface. The easiest way to do this is to place a slow trickling garden hose alongside the trunk. Soaker hoses and drip irrigation are also excellent ways to deliver water to the root zone. Irrigation systems designed for lawns may not deliver enough water to the root zone as these are set up for frequent, shallow watering. Frequent, shallow watering will only promote shallow roots. Deep, infrequent soakings will promote deep roots, allowing trees to establish faster and become more drought resistant.

·         Guarantied success! We offer a five year warranty on trees planted using Myke™ mycorrhizae for transplanting.